Wayne Township Cemeteries

Lindenwood Cemetery

Street View photo from Google map has over 270 user contributed photos uploaded to Google

2324 West Main Street, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Lindenwood Cemetery web site, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LindenwoodCemetery/. There are two unofficial Facebook pages: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lindenwood-Cemetery/222579204564719 and https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lindenwood-Cemetery/115382668491582

The following information is copied from their website:

History: Front entrance gate at Lindenwood Cemetery in Fort Wayne, Indiana, was founded in July 1859, and opened to the public on May 30, 1860. The 1st burial at Lindenwood Cemetery occurred on July 6, 1850.

A historic treasure: With more than 72,000 interments and 175 acres of land, Lindenwood Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in Indiana. Almost all the founding fathers of Fort Wayne rest in our cemetery. One of our most notable features is an iron gate entrance and fence, completed in 1884.

Military funeral history: Veteran's Section at Lindenwood CemeteryLindenwood Cemetery is the final resting place for hundreds of Civil War veterans. The Union Army was composed of 2.8 million soldiers and more than 4,000 were from Allen County, Indiana. Our cemetery features a plaque given in gratitude for the Allen County Union Army personnel in the Civil War and also honors the last survivor of the Allen County soldiers. Our cemetery continues to honor those who serve. Just inside our front gate are 6 flagpoles erected in 2002, dedicated to the branches of the U.S. Armed Forces and POW/MIA’s. Lindenwood Cemetery also dedicated a portion of the Westridge section exclusively to veterans and their spouses the same year. We proudly display our Avenue of Flags 4 times each year to honor our country and those who served. 

Chapels, bells and PBS: Built in 1895, our historic Chapel of the Woods is still in use today. Dedicated in 1967, Bohn Chapel is named after Frank E. Bohn, a former president of Lindenwood Cemetery. Most of Lindenwood’s interment services take place in this chapel. The reflecting pool outside of the chapel was built in 1972 and was once the site of an old historic lake. Our newest chapel, Gardenview Chapel, opened in 2007. Lindenwood’s Gardenview Mausoleum complex features a magnificent 55-foot Schulmerich Carillon bell tower erected in 1977. A commanding landmark for the community, it serves as a tribute to those who rest here. In 2004, Lindenwood was chosen as the site of the Northeast Indiana AIDS Memorial. Those interested in learning more about Lindenwood Cemetery can find fascinating additional details in a 1-hour documentary produced by PBS39, Fort Wayne’s local PBS station. Titled "Memorial City: The Lindenwood Chronicles," the film traces the history of Lindenwood Cemetery and Fort Wayne, Indiana.

What a difference!!! Thank you to Birkmeier & Sons Monument Co. for restoring this piece of Lindenwood History! The change is amazing!

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Monday, February 26, 2024

February 26, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

What a difference!!! Thank you to Birkmeier & Sons Monument Co. for restoring this piece of Lindenwood History! The change is amazing!

Hanna grave, Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, IN

The Samuel Hanna grave, Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, IN. after he died in June 1866 in the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library. The photo with a white obelisk tombstone in the background behind a tree on the left appears to show the early graves in Lindenwood Cemetery founded in July 1859 were literally buried in the existing forest. The cemetery currently has many big old trees but with wide open spaces between them. See Samuel Hanna and our Trees page.
[ This needs a Then and Now comparison photo ]

Lindenwood Cemetery Entrance - before 1895 to present

There are over 125 photographs for Lindenwood Cemetery search in the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library.

Postcard entrance to Lindenwood Cemetery   Postcard entrance to Lindenwood Cemetery

Left image Entrance to Lindenwood Cemetery This beautiful cemetery, the pride of Fort Wayne, is situated on Huntington Road, one-half mile west of the city limits. is from page 32 of the 1906 "Souvenir of Fort Wayne" pamphlet, in the Indiana Memory Hosted Digital Collections at IN.gov and the one on right is from 2024 posted in Comments to the April 24, 2024 The Avenue of Flags Facebook post below.

  Postcard entrance to Lindenwood Cemetery

Entrance to Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Ind. ebay colorized postcard.

The Avenue of Flags is just as beautiful as we remembered! Thank you to our grounds team for placing these today!

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Wednesday, April 24, 2024

Wednesday, April 24, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

The Avenue of Flags is just as beautiful as we remembered! Thank you to our grounds team for placing these today!

A photo that Becky Osbun recently shared with us was very much appreciated! We jumped to action and power washing began....

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, May 3, 2024

Friday, May 3, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

A photo that Becky Osbun recently shared with us was very much appreciated! We jumped to action and power washing began. The pillars look amazing, a very unruly plant was removed and many signs that were once present when you entered our beautiful gates have been removed/relocated. This project took one of our team members a day and a half to complete and we could not be more pleased with the results.

In 2023 Lindenwood Cemetery was designated as an Arboretum which is a place where trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants are cultivated for scientific and educational purposes. See our Lindenwood Cemetery page.
Lindenwood Cemetery Arboretum est. 2023

We are so ready for 2pm! Thank you again to Arbor Farms Nursery & Brandenberger Tree Care Professionals LLC for joining us today!!!

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, April 26, 2024

Friday, April 26, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

1st Annual Arbor Day Celebration

“As a newly designated arboretum, we are looking forward to building our tree population as well as making sure the species that are currently on our grounds remain healthy. We hope the Fort Wayne community enjoys our cemetery grounds and its diverse tree population,” General Manager of Lindenwood Cemetery Amber Gonzalez.

The Lindenwood Cemetery Arboretum at ArbNet.org The Interactive Community of Arboreta

Levels of Accreditation The four levels of accreditation recognize arboreta at various degrees of development, capacity, and professionalism. Accredited arboreta are encouraged to seek and achieve higher professional standards and move up through the levels.

Cookie Cottage never dissapoints! These turned out absolutely beautiful! Come out for cookies and saplings (while they last) tomorrow at 2pm!

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Thursday, April 25, 2024

Thursday, April 25, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

Cookie Cottage never dissapoints! These turned out absolutely beautiful! Come out for cookies and saplings (while they last) tomorrow at 2pm!

Thank you 21Alive for taking interest in our arboretum and sharing our story!

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, April 26, 2024

Friday, April 26, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

Thank you 21Alive for taking interest in our arboretum and sharing our story!

Fort Wayne’s Lindenwood Cemetery celebrates Arbor Day as new arboretum 

According to the cemetery’s general manager, Amber Gonzalez, the cemetery is hoping to achieve a Level 2 accreditation in the future.

Posted by WANE 15 on Friday, April 26, 2024

Friday, April 26, 2024 post by WANE 15 on Facebook:

According to the cemetery’s general manager, Amber Gonzalez, the cemetery is hoping to achieve a Level 2 accreditation in the future.

Lindenwood Cemetary celebrates Arbor Day with new accreditation

What a beautiful day for our Arbor Day Celebration! We have to thank our staff as well as Arbor Farms Nursery &...

Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, April 26, 2024

Friday, April 26, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

What a beautiful day for our Arbor Day Celebration! We have to thank our staff as well as Arbor Farms Nursery & Brandenberger Tree Care Professionals LLC! Arbor Farms generously donated 3 Linden Trees and planted the one at the entrance. Barb, from Arbor Farms, also led us on a tree identification hike and taught us all a few things! The Brandenberger team trimmed 2 trees by our mausoleum that were in need of some TLC. The difference is spectacular! Mason, from Brandenberger, shared helpful techiques and answered some questions a that our staff had. [ See Linden trees on Trees page ]

Last but not least, this was for our community! We are grateful for all who showed up and enjoyed the knowledge that was provided! We hope you enjoyed your cookies and hope you find the perfect place for your sapling!

It was an amazing day and we look forward to keeping you up to date on the happenings of the Arboretum!

Lindenwood Nature Preserve, 600 Lindenwood Avenue, is on the west side of Lindenwood Cemetery just across the road. It is a 110-acre wooded park featuring four hiking trails of varying lengths (one is wheelchair and stroller accessible) and a pond that allows visitors to see what the cemetery grounds and a lot of Allen County looked like when the cemetery opened in 1859.

Today is a beautiful day to come out and see some spring wildflowers at Lindenwood Nature Preserve. Lots of our wildlife are enjoying the pleasant temperatures as well!

Posted by Lindenwood Nature Preserve on Tuesday, April 9, 2024

Tuesday, April 9, 2024 post by the Lindenwood Nature Preserve on Facebook:

Today is a beautiful day to come out and see some spring wildflowers at Lindenwood Nature Preserve. Lots of our wildlife are enjoying the pleasant temperatures as well!

1886 - Homes! In the Silent City of the Dead

Article from Mar 29, 1886 The Fort Wayne Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Lindenwood cemetery, Silent cities, Fort wayne, Indiana, Cemetery

1886 - Homes! In the Silent City of the Dead The Fort Wayne Sentinel, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Monday, March 29, 1886, Page 1.

A Pen Picture of Lindenwood, Its Promoters, Its Price and Improvements.

The Magnificien Gravestones and a Plea for Plain, Christian Burials

FACTS FOR FUNERALS

And Information That Will Interest Every Lot Owner in Lindenwood.

It is likely this article is about the publication below:

Lindenwood cemetery, 1864 Publication date 1864, is a 48-page Archive.org, apparently the first of four versions of Lindenwood cemetery: articles of association, rules and regulations adopted, 1885 .. shown below.

History of Allen County, Indiana. Publication date 1880, Publisher Kingman Brothers on Archive.org.

Page 99 through page 101

EARLY HISTORY OF LINDENWOOD CEMETERY.

The necessity of a cemetery for the burial of the dead of the city and vicinity of Fort Wayne, which had been the subject of some solicitude for several years, reached a point at last that fully awakened the citizens to the fact that the only public burial ground of the city, which but a few years previous had been located beyond the limits of the city, was rapidly filling up, and, instead of being a quiet and retired place and a suitable repose for the remains of the dead, was soon destined to be in the midst of the bustle and confusion of business and amusement, and that, too, without an opportunity of extending the grounds to meet the necessities of the future.

The public also became awakened to the alarming fact that, in the' original purchase and sale of the grounds for burial purposes, no provision had been made by fixing the price of lots at such rates as would secure a sinking fund, by setting apart a portion of the sales to keep up the grounds after the lots were all sold, or, indeed, auy other provision that would secure it from further desecration. It was also seen that the seeds of neglect were already sown and the harvest ripening— decay and destruction had commenced, which began to grieve the hearts of those whose relatives and friends were deposited there. The graves were already being trampled upon by man and beast, monuments and other evidences of departed manhood erected by sorrowing friends, it was evident, were in danger of being defaced, and with it their memories perish and be soon forgotten.

The experience of the past was a sufficient warning to the future that some place should be selected at a suitable distance from the city, that would prevent the danger of its being disturbed by encroachments 'from its too near proximity to the prospective growth of the city in any contingency, and, at the same time, of such easy access as to be within the reach of all. Numerous public meetings were held by the citizens, and various places suggested. Their location, with reference to the roads, crossing of rivers, canals and railroads, the ease of access on the one hand and the impediments on the other, the adaptation of the grounds for the purpose of interment, the quality of soil, and all other matters supposed to have a bearing upon the subject, were from time to time discussed, uutil the most zealous became wearied and discouraged with the prospect of selecting a place that would give general satisfaction.

In this condition matters remained for several months; but the necessity of the case was pressing itself upon the minds of reflecting persons with such earnestness that the different locations, with all the arguments in favor and all the objections urged against them, were canvassed with much freedom and with a determined will that a location must be made, having as few objections and as many advantages as possible. Fortunately for the public, the minds of several of our citizens soon drifted in the same direction, who secured, at the earliest possible moment, the grounds now occupied for the purpose, which are so universally admired by the many thousand persons that visit them, amid the wonder and amazement of everybody how it was that grounds adapted in such a wonderful degree to agricultural purposes should have remained in a state of nature, on the very borders of the city, so long a time, as if by Divine appointment, to be consecrated as the “ city of the dead.” Its beautifully diversified surface, with undulating hills, ravines and valleys, fixing as it were the very bounds of every section, in such an admirable manner as to leave the scientific gardener almost at fault to suggest improvement in the execution of his skill. The soil is mostly dry and peculiarly adapted to burial purposes, either for vaults, chapels or single interments.

On the 5th day of July, 1859, Jesse L. Williams, Hugh McCulloch, Charles D. Bond, David F. Comparet, Royal W. Taylor, Allen Hamilton, Alexander M. Orbison, John E. Hill, Pliny Hoagland, Alfred D. Brandriff, Ochmig Bird and Isaac D. G. Nelson purchased the property set forth in the Articles of Association, for the sum of $7,627.50, the title for which was to be taken in the name of Jesse L. Williams, for the use of the company, which was duly deeded to the President of Lindenwood Cemetery by the said Jesse L. Williams, on the 14th day of May, 1860.

The land, when purchased, was in an exceedingly wild condition, nearly the whole ground being covered with a thick growth of underbrush, and what is now the approach or entrance was an impassable marsh. About sixty-five acres off of [see page 101]

Lindenwood cemetery now comprises 124 acres, of which seventy acres are used for burial. The grounds are surrounded by an iron fence, 1,700 feet in length, is five feet high, set upon stone posts, three feet in the ground. It cost $2,652.25 and will last for generations.

The "Gate Lodge," built in a picturesque style of Gothic architecture, is located just inside the entrance gates covering a space 35x31 feet. The floors are laid with black and white marble tile, and the various rooms wainscoted with marbelized slate, and the walls and grained ceilings neatly frescoed. A circular bell-tower breaks out in one of the angles, and at the base is an open loggia leading to both the private office and reception room.

On the 17th day of March, 1884, the trustees sold about three acres lying on the west border of the cemetery grounds, to the Achduth Veshalom congregation' for their exclusive use for burial purposes.

Page 283, Volume 2 of the book Valley of the upper Maumee River, with historical account of Allen County and the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana, Publication date 1889 on Archive.org.

1900 - The Silent Cities Last Resting Places for our Beloved Dead

Article from May 26, 1900 The Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Fort wayne, Indiana, Lindenwood cemetery, Cemetery

1900 - The Silent Cities Last Resting Places for our Beloved Dead The Fort Wayne News, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Saturday, May 26, 1900, Page 4

1900 - The Silent Cities cont'd

Article from May 26, 1900 The Fort Wayne News (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Lindenwood cemetery, Fort wayne, Indiana, Cemetery

1900 - The Silent Cities cont'd The Fort Wayne News, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Saturday, May 26, 1900, Page 6
Includes: Hebrew Section of Lindenwood, The Concordia Cemetery, The Catholic Cemetery, St. John Evangelical Lutheran

 

Darker version: 1900 - The Silent Cities - Last Resting Places for our Beloved Dead Fort Wayne Daily News, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Saturday, May 26, 1900, Page 4; 1900 - The Silent Cities cont'd Fort Wayne Daily News, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Saturday, May 26, 1900, Page 6

1914 - Beautiful Lindenwood, The Silent City of the Dead

Article from Aug 23, 1914 The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Fort wayne, Indiana, Lindenwood cemetery, Cemetery
1914 - Beautiful Lindenwood, The Silent City of the Dead The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Sunday, Aug 23, 1914, Page 17. Sections: In Memory of First President, The Slab of the Pauper's Grave, Scenery Result of Landscape Artist, A New Era for the Burial Parks, Gold Fish in Lagoon All Year, History of Cemetery and Buildings, In Memory of the Dead.

Page 447, The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Taylor, Samuel R., Mrs, Publication date: 1917 on Archive.org.

THE BEGINNING OF LINDENWOOD CEMETERY.

The year 1859 marks the culmination of the plans of a company of far-seeing citizens who had endeavored for several years to secure a suitable location for a cemetery which would serve the needs of the city for many years to come — a place which would yield to the efforts of the landscape gardener and become a permanently beautiful city of the dead. How well their plans matured is attested by the Lindenwood of today.

On the 5th of July, I. D. G. Nelson, Jesse L. Williams, Hugh McCulloch, Charles D. Bond, David F. Comparet, Royal W. Taylor, Allen Hamilton, Alexander M. Orbison, John E. Hill, Pliny Hoagland, Alfred D. Brandriff and Ochmig Bird purchased a tract of 153 acres known as the Pollock plat, at a cost of $7,627.50, which developed into the present beautiful Lindenwood cemetery. The approach was an almost impassable marsh and the ground was covered with thick underbrush. In 1860, when I. D. G. Nelson was elected president and Charles D. Bond secretary and treasurer of the Fort Wayne Cemetery association, the additional amount expended for improvement was $1,841.52. Solemn and impressive ceremonies on May 30, 1860 — a date in future years to be designated as sacred to the memory of many who were then about to enter

Page 448

upon the military service of the United States — marked the dedication of this beautifiil spot.

John W. Doswell became the superintendent of the cemetery at the time of its opening.

Page 500

GRAVE ROBBERIES.

The report refers to several cases of the removal of bodies from Lindenwood and other cemeteries, which had resulted in the arrest of six physicians and one student. The investigation of the cases was replete with sensational features. In one instance, when the body of a Roanoke (Indiana) man was found within the college walls, a prominent member of the faculty declared that he believed that professional grave robbers in the employ of the enemies of the institution had placed the body there "with a view to bringing our college into disrepute." The physician added the information that within a brief period thirty graves had been robbed.

In 1877, ghouls removed the body of a prominent citizen from a grave in Lindenwood cemetery ; the cemetery association offered a reward of $1,000 for information leading to the arrest of the culprits.

It is of interest to note that the Fort Wayne College of Medicine survived the attacks made upon it and became recognized as one of the leading institutions in the middle west. During its later years and until the college was made a part of Purdue University, it occupied the home of the late Judge Hugh McCulloch, on West Superior street, now the headquarters of the Fort Wayne Turnverein Vorwaerts. In later years the medical department of Purdue

Page 501

was taken over by the Indiana University and the course of study includes attendance in departments at Bloomington and Indianapolis.

Page 536

Activities of 1895

A crematory for the incineration of the bodies of the dead was established in 1895 in Lindenwood cemetery. It was the first of its kind in the state of Indiana. . . .

December 12, 1977 National Register of Historic Places at the National Register of Historic Places and National Historic Landmarks Program Records: Indiana at The National Archives. Includes several photographs.

Lindenwood is a park or landscaped lawn cemetery designed in 1860 according to eighteenth century English picturesque principles.

Originally a marshy wooded area outside Fort Wayne, Lindenwood is now located in the city limits. It is bounded by Saint Francis College, light Industry, and a commercial strip.The cemetery was designed to conform to the natural topography of the site which in contrast to generally level land of the city was "varied and picturesque" with natural ravines and gently rolling hillocks. Lindenwood has 175 acres of undulating landscape articulated by winding roads and punctuated by grottoes, gazeboes, and small bridges of unwrought stone. These features provide scenic or picturesque vistas throughout the cemetery in keeping with the picturesque landscape tradition.

Areas originally designed for sunken gardens still exist although they are now covered with grass. There are steps set into the hillocks leading to sunken areas, grottoes,and gazeboes placed in the former gardens. Of the two original lakes, Glen Lake at the east border just inside the main entrance has been reconstructed while Twin Sisters Lake no longer exists. Another lake has been constructed at the far southwest corner of thecemetery. A natural waterway also runs through the property.The original plan of Lindenwood Cemetery remains intact, and it has retained its park-like character. Although many of the lindenwood trees, for which the cemetery was named, have died) the cemetery has a policy to plant ten linden trees for every one that has died.

The original gatehouse, constructed in 1884, has been demolished and modern cemeterybuildings have been built on the grounds; however, they have not disrupted the landscape plan. A Romanesque Revival style limestone chapel with bell tower designed by local architects Wing and Mahurin in 1895 still remains. New bronze window frames with tinted art glass have been installed as have bronze colored double aluminum doors in the westand south facades of the structure. A greenhouse from the Bass Estate, which is being processed for nomination to the National Register, has been moved to Lindenwood and is utilized as a service building.

WFWA-TV39 PBS Fort Wayne information:

Memorial City: The Lindenwood Chronicles from WFWA-TV39 PBS Fort Wayne Special | 51m 30s Learn about the history of Fort Wayne's historic Lindenwood Cemetery. Aired: 01/04/02 Rating: NR. 'Memorial City: the Lindenwood Chronicles' takes you beyond mausoleums, grass and gravestones to offer insights of some of the people interred at Lindenwood. The history of the cemetery itself is profiled as well as offering a look at how customs have changed since it was founded, providing insights into our own corner of America since Lindenwood's founding in 1859. DVD at Allen County Public Library.

Lindenwood Cemetery ca. 1920 is used with permission by Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and author published February 21, 2017 with photo in Fort Wayne Reader.

The city fathers determined in 1859 that the Broadway or “City” Cemetery which had been developed in 1837 was too small to continue serving the growing community’s needs and that a larger non-sectarian cemetery was required for our city of then 10,000 people. As a result, twelve leading citizens purchased the initial 152 acres of virgin forest, marsh, and scrub and named it Lindenwood Cemetery due to all the Linden trees that then occupied the property.

When the development of Lindenwood was ready to commence, John H. Dowsell was appointed the superintendent and supervising landscape architect. He designed the cemetery in the style of the 18th century English “picturesque” tradition with rolling hills, sunken gardens, water features, grottos, and expansive vistas giving the cemetery an idealized picture like quality.

The first burial took place in 1860 and also beginning that year, and ending in 1886, the deceased from the old Broadway cemetery were disinterred and reburied at Lindenwood except the remains of the state’s seventh governor, Samual Bigger as no family members we available to approve the move. In addition, as no one was sure where his grave was located, William Polke, one of the 43 delegates from the Indiana Territory to the 1816 Indiana Constitutional Convention was also left behind, and was finally rediscovered and given a headstone as part of Allen County’s Indiana Bicentennial activities last year. In 1886 the old Broadway Cemetery was then donated to the city by Hugh and Susan McCulloch for use as a public park, and thus became McCulloch Park. It’s considered likely that in additional remains still lie below the grassy park surface in unmarked graves.

Until the late 1870’s the Wabash & Erie Canal ran parallel and along the south side of the section of West Main that is across from the cemetery. This necessitated a swing bridge being constructed across the canal east of the cemetery to allow access for funerals and visitors from the city.

A walk through Lindenwood today is to see a list of familiar city streets and parks as the interred include such last names as those of Capt. Asa Fairfield, William Pettit, Jr., Laura Suttenfield, David Foster, John Franke, Samuel Hanna, Pliny Hoagland, William Pettit, Henry Rudisill, William Rockhill, Col. Thomas Swinney, Theodore Thieme, Judge William Vesey, Jesse Williams, David Colerick, Joseph Nuttman, Samuel Edsall, Col. George Ewing, Joseph Brackenridge, Fred Eckart, Olaf Guldlin, and Allen Hamilton among the over 72,000 other interred deceased.

Lindenwood cemetery: articles of association, rules and regulations adopted, 1885 ..by Lindenwood Cemetery (Fort Wayne, Ind.)Publication date 1886, on Archive.org. A 104-page book is labeled copy 4 on the More tab by ACPL book Lindenwood cemetery: articles of association, rules and regulations adopted, 1885 ... as opposed to copy 2 with 92 pages.

Lindenwood cemetery: articles of association, rules and regulations adopted, 1885 ..by Lindenwood Cemetery (Fort Wayne, Ind.) Publication date 1886, on Archive.org. A 92-page book is labeled copy 2 on the More tab by ACPL book Lindenwood cemetery: articles of association, rules and regulations adopted, 1885 ... as opposed to copy 4 with 104 pages.

The Lindenwood Cemetery rules, regulations, etc., Fort Wayne, Indianaby Lindenwood Cemetery (Fort Wayne, Ind.) Publication date 1914, 28 pages on Archive.org is apparently the third of four versions of Lindenwood cemetery: articles of association, rules and regulations adopted, 1885 ..

Pioneers resting in historic Lindenwood by Paulison, Arthur Marion, 1905-, Publication date 1973, on Archive.org. The Foreword states: Brief biographical sketches of many Fort Wayne pioneer men and women, published twice monthly in the local press by Lindenwood Cemetery, have attracted wide interest. Because of many requests for reprints of this series under one cover, we are grouping this work under the title, "Historic Lindenwood." Here you can see the drawings and read the short stories about many Hoosiers who led in the early development of Fort Wayne. These illustrious men and women rest in Lindenwood where one can find thousands of memorials relating to local, state and national history. Research and writing for these capsule biographies was done by Arthur M. Paulison, Executive Director of Lindenwood Cemetery. The drawings are by Morris R. Perry.

Pioneers resting in historic Lindenwood 1989 edition by Paulison, Arthur Marion, 1905-1989, a 172 page edition, his 58 page 1973 edition is shown above borth are Archive.orgs. The Foreword states: This publication contains 156 brief biographical sketches of Fort Wayne pioneers and civic leaders who are interred in Linden wood Cemetery. They were originally published in the Fort Wayne Newspapers and later compiled into three booklets issued by the Fort Wayne Public Library in 1973, 1976 and 1978. Research and writing for these capsule biographies was done by Arthur M. Paulison and many of the drawings were by Morris R. Perry.

Back to top

The Lindenwood Story 1860 - 1979 - by Paulison, Arthur M. (Arthur Marion), 1905- on Internet Archive.
Originally published in book form in 1979, and previously in Old Fort news, v. 24, no. 3 (1979).
The Lindenwood office offers a free book The Lindenwood Story about the history and famous people buried there. It has many photos and details such as the antique wrought iron fence was erected in 1884 from the main office along Main Street to the west. The original fence contract was let to Seward and Company, Bloomington, Indiana, calling for 1,711 linear feet, costing $2,566. Another 704 linear feet was added in 1933 along Lindenwood Avenue, costing $1,091, and it was built by Bass Foundry & Machine Company.

Lindenwood Cemetery Records from April 1896-December 1917; Contributor Lindenwood Cemetery and Fort Wayne Genealogical Society; scanning by the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana for Internet Archive.

Lindenwood Cemetery Internment Records Volume January 1918-March 1934
Publication date 1918; Collection allencountygenealogicalsocietyofindiana

Back to top

Founded in 1859 - see IndianaHistory.org article, dedicated in 1860. Modern cemetery still in use. IN DNR Latitude 41.08 Longitude 85.1758.

Layout map at ACGSI.org

Go to: NSDAR tombstone photos, Find-A-Grave, Google map.

Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1860 to 2021 search at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Description [10-1-2022] states: Lindenwood Cemetery in Fort Wayne is one of the largest and oldest cemeteries in Allen County and is listed on the National Historic Register. In 1973, the staff of the Genealogy Department of the Allen County Public Library compiled a 14-volume set of transcriptions of the Lindenwood sexton's records from 1860 to 1972. They also compiled an abstract of the 1976 to 1978 data. The Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana compiled an index in Microsoft Word for the 1993 to 2016 burials in Lindenwood Cemetery and also transcribed the earlier published records. This search is a translation of their work. NOTE: Currently A through K of the 1973 to 1975 time frame is available at this site.

  1. Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne IN: sunken gardens. possibly June 1938
    Lindenwood Cemetery search at the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Libraryhas over 125 photos that made the cemetery a travel destination 100 years ago.
  2. Lindenwood Cemetery was the scene of early grave robberies in the 1870s for the Fort Wayne Medical College.
  3. Lindenwood Cemetery (INFWLC) along with Anthony Halberstadt Chapter SAR (IN0027P) are at Wreaths Across America.
  4. Lindenwood Cemetery Crematorium built in 1895, first cremation in 1897 from The Lindenwood Story: 1860-1979 reprinted 1995, by Arthur M. Paulison, history posted October 19, 2014 by Daniel Baker - Photographer on Facebook with a 2014 photo.
    1. The Lindenwood Crematory, Circa 1898 and 2018: The modern cremation movement had a slow start in the United States in the 1870s. It took several Fort Wayne businessmen five years to persuade the Lindenwood Cemetery association that a crematory was not only beneficial, but would put the city in the prestigious company of larger metropolises like Chicago and Boston. In 1895, architectural firm Wing & Mahurin was tasked with designing the limestone Romanesque building. The contract was signed in August and Indiana’s first crematory was completed three months later. On July 1, 1897, John Powers became the first person in Indiana to be cremated. Despite the success, cremation would not be widely accepted until the late 20th Century. In 1974, the crematory was renamed the Chapel of the Woods after an extensive remodeling. Over the following years, cremations were transitioned to more modern facilities offsite and, today, the old crematory serves only as a chapel. Copied from an October 21, 2018 post by Daniel Baker with 1898 and 2018 photos on his new book Fort Wayne Through Time co-authored with Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and author on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.
  5. Over 100 items are found in a search for Lindenwood Cemetery for photos in the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library.
  6. Over 36 items are found in a Lindenwood Cemetery search at the Allen County Public Libraryonline catalog.
  7. Lindenwood Cemetery Google search finds many pages.
  8. A Walk in the Park by Eric Olson, 21Country Featured Reporter published May 9, 2017.
  9. Photo of a Memorial Day Parade entering Lindenwood Cemetery, c. 1900 posted May 25, 2015 by Visit Fort Wayne on Facebook.
  10. Legends of Lindenwood published in the May 17-19, 2002 The Journal Gazette newspaper Weekender discussed the Dearly Departed tour.
  11. Dearly Departed 2013 - cemetery tour sponsored by ARCH and The History Centersee photos on Facebook.
  12. Dearly Departed 2014 discusses the 15 men on the October 4, 2014 ARCH ( Architecture and Community Heritage) cemetery tour by Nancy McCammon-Hansen published October 2, 2014 in History Center Notes & Queries blog.
  13. History of Lindenwood by owner Dignity Memorial.
  14. Our Infamous Burials page includes Homer Van Meter the driver for John Dillinger the bank robber buried here in Lindenwood.
  15. U.S. Register of Historic Places added in 1978 - #78000043. See photo of February 17, 1978 plaque on Dearly Departed 2013 tour above.
  16. Pioneers Resting in Historic Lindenwood a 62 page Internet Archiveebook, shown below, was written in 1973 by Fred J. Reynolds Head Librarian at the Allen County Public Library.
  17. Memorial City the Lindenwood chronicles PBS 39 TV 2001 documentary at the Allen County Public Library.
  18. Grave secrets Old cemeteries offer history lesson, scenic views July 19, 2009 by Devon Haynie of The Journal Gazette newspaper.
  19. Lindenwood Cemetery at 150 May 26, 2010 by John Beatty on the History Center Notes & Queries blog.
  20. THE LINDENWOOD STORY by The Waynedale News Staff published May 21, 2010 on Waynedale History.
  21. HISTORIC LINDENWOOD CEMETERY January 4, 2013 by John Beatty on the FGS Conference News blog (Federation of Genealogical Societies).
  22. Cemetery Keeps Traditions of Education, Celebration Thriving by 89.1 WBOI published November 2, 2015 on wboi.org. Includes a 5-minute audio interview of WBOI's Katy Anderson with the cemetery's general manager, Tom Pehlke, to talk about the history of this landmark and its place in the community from the earliest Fort Wayne cemetery where the current Allen County Jail was located in 2015 to the Broadway Cemetery to the founding of Lindenwood Cemetery.  
  23. 20 Famous Burial locations and tombstone photos from Find-A-Grave
  24. Politicians buried here from Political Graveyard.
  25. Wikimedia has some information.
  26. In 2004, Fort Wayne resident Otis Vincent announced plans to build a memorial in Fort Wayne in memory of people who had died of AIDS. Seven years later, the memorial, built under the name of a non-profit called the Northeast Indiana AIDS Memorial, has been completed. From Northeast Indiana AIDS Memorial at AIDSMemorial.info memorial SIDA.info.
  27. February 22, 2017 1920 photo and discussion by Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and authoron You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.
  28. July 8, 2021 post by ARCH, Inc. on Facebook:

    Have you seen this unusual building in Lindenwood Cemetery and wondered what it was? Currently it is used for storage, but it had a grand life before its cemetery days. The building was located at Brookside, the John Henry Bass estate, where University of Saint Francis is now. The building used to be the “Palm House.” Tropical plants were grown in this building.

  29. Cemeteries and their historic landscaping podcast includes Lindenwood Cemetery October 01, 2022 in Archives of Hoosier History Live podcast on Saturdays, noon to 1 p.m. ET on WICR 88.7 FM.
  30. Allen County unveils monument to 1,202 who died of COVID-19 James D. Wolf Jr. published October 30, 2022 on The Journal Gazette newspaper. See Wayback Machine copy. Selected slightly modified sentences include: A large, black granite memorial stands in honor of the 1,202 Allen County residents who died of the coronavirus. Edmund Brager, was the first person in Allen County known to die of the virus on March 22, 2020. Photo shows Linda Brager widow of the first known victim of COVID-19 in Allen County. Signs inside the cemetery grounds point the way to the memorial, which stands on the south terrace area near the Northeast Indiana AIDS Memorial. The 5-foot-high monument is circled by four curved, black granite benches. Come April 2022, two trees will be planted. A brick path will also be added, stretching from the road to the monument, encircling it, and people have the option of buying one in memory of those they lost. The monument was designed by Kathryn Morton with Birkmeier & Sons Monument Co. and took eight months to complete, Gonzalez said. Thomas Pehlke, the recently retired general manager for Lindenwood, said he hoped the monument would become a place of where people from throughout northeast Indiana and northwest Ohio can find comfort. Support for the monument came from the Community Foundation of Greater Fort Wayne.
  31. Oct. 29 - Dedications set for Lindenwood Cemetery memorials by Mary Anne Gates For Business Weekly Oct 29, 2022 at Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly. The groundskeeping crew at Lindenwood Cemetery have been busy. Recently they were installing a new COVID-19 memorial. Additionally, in recent weeks they have also refreshed the nearby Northeast Indiana AIDS Memorial. The COVID-19 memorial was to be unveiled Oct. 29, while the AIDS memorial will be rededicated at 1 p.m. Dec. 1, World AIDS Day.
  32. October 30, 2022 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    After more than a year of planning and months of waiting for the memorial to arrive, we were honored to dedicate the COVID-19 Memorial yesterday.

  33. October 31, 2022 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    The COVID-19 Memorial Dedication was more than we thought possible. We were honored to Allen County Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Gutwein deliver a powerful welcome address. City Councilman Tom Didier sang "Amazing grace" and "How great thou art". Dignity Memorial Celebrant Doug Show performed a celebrant service for the 1,202 lives lost to COVID-19 in Allen County. Lindenwood's General Manager Amber Gonzalez dedicated the memorial. Lindenwood's Office Manager Leah Hadashi was joined by Birkmeier& Sons Monument Company Monument Specialist Kathryn Morton and Shop Manager Zach Sheets to unveil the memorial.

  34. Allen County unveils monument to 1,202 who died of COVID-19 James D. Wolf Jr. published October 30, 2022 on The Journal Gazette newspaper. See Wayback Machine copy. A large, black granite memorial stands in honor of the 1,202 Allen County residents who died of the coronavirus. Edmund Brager, was the first person in Allen County known to die of the virus on March 22, 2020.
  35. January 17, 2023 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    Laying at the COVID-19 Memorial here at Lindenwood Cemetery this morning was a Ziplock bag with the pictured items inside. To say that we we are honored that Tristan’s families mission found its way to us is an understatement. Thank you for this precious gift and for sharing a little portion of your son’s life with us. #tristanshotwheelsfromheaven

  36. May 9, 2023 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    What a great article! Thank you to WANE.com for this!

    Lindenwood Cemetery is a burial ground for thousands of Civil War veterans by Joe McQueen May 9, 2023 on CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15.

    See our Civil War page.

  37. May 9, 2023 post by WANE 15 on Facebook:

    Lindenwood Cemetery on West Main Street has been a final resting place for people, especially military veterans, since 1860. The front entrance to the cemetery contains six flagpoles to honor all the U.S. military branches.

  38. September 6, 2023 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    It’s official! Development has commenced on the newest addition to Lindenwood…we are so proud to share Garden of Remembrance with you!

    During development we are offering a one time only discount of 15% on spaces. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment to get further details. 260-432-4542

  39. October 6, 2023 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    And just like that…Garden of Remembrance is ready to go. It was so much fun watching this are develop into a unique and beautiful garden. We will be having a dedication on October 28th. Stay tuned for details!

     

    First new addition since 1986!

    The Garden is a 31,913-square-foot section of the cemetery that is primarily a monument section for memorials and headstones. It features 12 multi-generational estates. The Garden also has 21 flush spaces, six white pillars and a concrete and brick sidewalk.

    Lindenwood Cemetery announces the addition of Garden of Remembrance Kymmi Amato, October 25, 2023 Fox 55 Fort Wayne.

  40. October 28, 2023 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    Garden of Remembrance is officially open! We will be here until 2 to answer all your questions about the newest addition at Lindenwood.

  41. Lindenwood Cemetery and the American Cemetery Movement Andrea A., January 28, 2024 Between the Lines Family & History blog.
  42. Pardon the detours on the cemetery grounds today. We have a few trees being removed for safety reasons.

    Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Wednesday, May 15, 2024

    Wednesday, May 15, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    Pardon the detours on the cemetery grounds today. We have a few trees being removed for safety reasons.

  43. For the safety of our visitors, the front gates will be closed for approximately an hour while a tree is removed. This beautiful tree lost a limb yesterday and will be safely removed soon.

    Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, May 17, 2024

    Friday, May 17, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    For the safety of our visitors, the front gates will be closed for approximately an hour while a tree is removed. This beautiful tree lost a limb yesterday and will be safely removed soon.

    [ See Oaks information on our Trees page ]

  44. Our stunning White Oak came down safely. The professionalism, safety and care that Brandenberger Tree Care Professionals LLC provides is first class.

    Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, May 17, 2024

    Friday, May 17, 2024 video post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    Our stunning White Oak came down safely. The professionalism, safety and care that Brandenberger Tree Care Professionals LLC provides is first class.

  45. Zack at Brandenberger Tree Care Professionals LLC did an outstanding job advising our team of what we could expect...

    Posted by Lindenwood Cemetery on Friday, May 17, 2024

    Friday, May 17, 2024 post by Lindenwood Cemetery on Facebook:

    Zack at Brandenberger Tree Care Professionals LLC did an outstanding job advising our team of what we could expect before they started the process. This played out precisely as he predicted. Seeing this beauty come down was heartbreaking. Our main entrance will have a whole new look when you enter our gates.

Videos

Exploring Lindenwood Cemetery posted May 1, 2022 by Middle Aged Bald Guy on YouTube
Today's adventure takes us to Fort Wayne located in the northeast portion of the state of Indiana. Nestled in the east side of this city is a cemetery that contains over 67,000 graves and is over 200 years old. This cemetery is home to many of the early pioneers that started Fort Wayne. It is also home to some remarkable tombstones, monuments, and mausoleums. So please join me as I explore this amazing historical cemetery.

Back to top

Page updated: