People of Allen County, Indiana

J Surnames

Jackson, Samuel D.

January 28, 2023 post by Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook:

#OTD in 1944, Allen County attorney and politician Samuel D. Jackson took his seat in the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Indiana Senator Frederick Van Nuys. Born in 1895, Jackson attended Fort Wayne schools where his peers called him “Serious Sam” for his studious nature. Jackson graduated from law school at Indiana University in 1917. While he was admitted to the bar that year, he delayed practicing for two years in order to serve in the Army during WWI. He began a law practice in Fort Wayne in 1919 and served as Prosecuting Attorney for Allen County during the 1920s. In the 1930s, he served as Chairman of the Indiana Democratic State Speakers Bureau. In 1940, Governor M. Clifford Townsend appointed Jackson Attorney General of Indiana. In 1944, he served as Chairman of the Democratic National Convention at Chicago. That year, he also ran for governor, narrowly losing to Ralph F. Gates as Republicans swept the 1944 elections. When Jackson died in 1951, Governor Henry Schricker told the Indianapolis Times, “Mr. Jackson was one of my very best friends and one of the most conscientious public servants I have ever known.” Read the full obituary courtesy of Hoosier State Chronicles: https://bit.ly/3C3vmi7.

Image courtesy of the Jewish Post, Hoosier State Chronicles.

S. D. Jackson, Former U. S. Senator, Is Dead [includes a photo]

Colorful Hoosier Office Holder Samuel D. Jackson, former U. 8. Senator from Indiana and one of the state's most colorful office holders, died today in St. Joseph’s Hospital in Ft. Wayne. The 55-year-old Allen County native had been in critical condition in the hosptial for several days.

He suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and was rushed to the hospital Tuesday night. He died at 9:30 a. m.

Indiana’s attorney-general ‘in the first administration of Gov. Schricker, Mr. Jackson was Democratic nominee for Governor in 1944 but lost to Republican Ralph Gates. Copied from page 1, continuted on page 2 of the Indianapolis Times,Indianapolis, Marion County, 8 March 1951 on Hoosier State Chronicles Indiana's Digital Historic Newspaper Program.

Jaenicke, Adolph

1860-1948, born in Berlin, Germany, hired by Col. David N. Foster to be Superintendent of Parks. See 1860-1948 Adolph Jaenicke on The Cultural Landscape Foundation tclf.org which has more information on other parks and designers.

Jasper, George W.

George W. Jasper was born in Fort Wayne about 1859 to Rudolph Jasper and Elizabeth Antrup. George was the youngest of the family, with 6 older siblings. His parents hailed from Germany and his father supported the family working as a carpenter.

He married Anna Stammer in Toledo, Ohio in 1896 and the couple returned to Fort Wayne. They had four children during their marriage: Alba, Irene, Ralph, and Paul.

George worked as hoseman, driver, and Captain in the No. 3 engine house from 1895-1909. He is pictured here in his dress uniform in 1898. While responding to a fire on Calhoun St. in 1896, he fell through the “half-burned floor of one of the buildings” and sustained injury. Jasper was made 1st Assistant Chief in 1909 and served in this role until his death.

He died at home on March 20, 1917 of a heart attack. The Ft. Wayne Sentinel published respects to the firefighter: “In the death of Assistant Fire Chief, George W. Jasper, the city and its citizens have lost a valuable, honest, and faithful official. It was in large part due to his indefatigable labor and persistence that the fire department has been made one of the most modern, complete, and up-to-date departments in the state of Indiana”. Mr. Jasper is buried at Lindenwood Cemetery in Ft. Wayne.

Explore the Ft. Wayne Firefighter collection under Government Records on the Fort Wayne and Allen County Resources page at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

(1917, March 23) “Gave His Best”. Fort Wayne Sentinel, p. 9.

(1896, September 11) “Two Fireman Injured”. Fort Wayne Sentinel, p. 1.`

Copied from a January 6, 2023 post with photo by Genealogy Center on Facebook titled: It’s #FirefighterFriday! Each Friday in January, we will be featuring photos and historical bios from our firefighter collection (Collection courtesy of Donald A. Weber).

Jehl, Daniel J.

Died Sunday, July 19, 2015, at home, born in Fort Wayne, he graduated from Central Catholic High School. Former Frost, El Mexicano political writer Dan Jehl crosses over at 68 published July 27, 2015 in Frost Illustrated now on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.

Jenkins, Mary Fairfield

Came to Fort Wayne in 1833 before the canals or railroad. Obituary in the The Fort Wayne Journal Gazette January 30, 1916 was posted onthe original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.

Jenney, James

Founded Jenney Electric in 1881. See Light of the world by Kevin Leininger --Dec. 19, 1982 from the archives of The News-Sentinel newspaper.

Johns, Alfred Lee

A. L. Johns & Co. on page 35 of Fort Wayne illustrated Publication date 1897 on Archive.org.
A. L. JOHNS & CO. Manufacturers of Hand- Made Harness SUMMIT CITY TEAM PADS. W. Columbia St. FORT WAYNE. FORT WAYNE can truthfully claim to have one of the neatest and most practically arranged harness and saddlery establishment, not only in Indiana, but in the entire United States. Saddlery salesmen who travel over the entire country say they know of none that will surpass it. This building was built expressly for the saddle business, is 40x110 feet, six stories and high basement, The fifth and sixth stories having windows on four sides, giving perfect light for manufacturing. It is accupied by A. L. Johns & Co. the oldest established harness house in Indiana, who have made a national reputation by the superior quality of goods manufactured by them. They make a large line of Buggy, Surrey, Driving, Express and Team Harness. In the latter they excel all competitors, they make the broad claim that their team harness is superior to any made elsewhere at wholesale at any price. Thev carry an extensive line of Saddlery Hardware, Whips, Collars, Fly Nets, Lap Dusters, Robes, Blankets, Harness Oils, and Soaps, Axle Grease, etc., etc. and handle harness leather extensively, having the sole agency for Northwestern Indiana. ( Ohio and Southern Michigan, for the celebrated "Globe Pure Oak Hand Stuffed Leather, one of the best wearing and most economical cutting brands of leather made in the United States. It costs several cents more per pound than ordinary leather but up-to-date harness makers, who are looking for future business, find it pays to buy the best leather that money will buy and prefer the Globe to all others. It is by using this leather exclusively in their best grades of harness that A. L. Johns & Co have established their reputation for making the most reliable harness. Harness dealers will find this firm strictly reliable and honorable in all business transactions, as well as wide-awake, up-to-date and hustling to draw trade to Ft. Wayne, the natural source of supply for a very large territory.

Fort Wayne, circa 1890 - Alfred Lee Johns (1850-1936), grew up in the saddlery business of his father and by the early 1880s owned A. L. Johns and Company, seen here at 51-53 East Columbia Street (this building is now gone and the site of Friemann Square). The company manufactured harnesses, as well as sold robes, blankets, nets, whips, and curry combs. In about 1895-96 the business moved into the new Bash Building at 130-132 West Columbia Street, in what is now The Landing Fort Wayne. See the comments for a picture their later building. (The Indiana Album: Kevin Kastner Collection). Copied from a November 13, 2018 post with a 1890 Kevin Kastner Collection photo by the Indiana Album on Facebook.

Johnston, Elizabeth

ELIZABETH JOHNSTON JONES On September 22, 1807 Elizabeth Johnston was born in blockhouse #1, Fort Wayne, IN. At the...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Tuesday, September 23, 2014

September 23, 2014 post by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

Other posts: September 22, 2015, February 21, 2017, and March 21, 2022.

ELIZABETH JOHNSTON JONES 

On September 22, 1807 Elizabeth Johnston was born in blockhouse #1, Fort Wayne, IN. At the time Fort Wayne was still, literally, a fort. She would have come into the world when her father John was US Factor to the Indians. Her earliest years would have been spent in the company of her brother Stephen, for her sister, Rebecca, died approximately 6 months before she was born. This made Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of the family. As such, as a young girl and teen, she seems to have been the little 'mommy' to her younger siblings. Elizabeth's existing letters reveal a woman who cares deeply for her extended family and is concerned about the proper order of things. These traits epitomized her adult life as the wife of John D. Jones of Cincinnati, one of the Queen City's premiere merchants.

Elizabeth was married on her sixteenth birthday to John Davies Jones, ten years her senior, in the Upper Piqua farmhouse September 22, 1823. While marriage near this age was not unusual in the early 1800s, she was still a very young bride. The household she kept in Cincinnati would have taken all of her young attention and energy to manage. Elizabeth and her husband supported the city’s many charitable organizations, including founding an institution for orphans, and their children were involved in the bank and railroad industries, several serving as presidents of major companies. Three of her sons served the Union side in the War Between the States. Col. William Graham Jones was killed in action at the Battle of Chickamagua, TN

Living in Cincinnati, the family was subject to the frequent outbreaks of cholera common to the time. The losses - which included three daughters lost in a period of less than two years -seem to have left Elizabeth's physical strength fragile. Her brother Stephen expresses concern for her in several of his extant letters, wishing she could avail herself of the 'sulfurous waters' in order to heal. As eldest surviving child of John Johnston, she served as her father’s executor. Elizabeth died November 19, 1878, at the age of 71 and is buried in Cincinnati.

Catharine Johnston Holtzbecher to A. R. Johnston, Cincinnati Sept. 23rd, 1840
My dear Brother, I wrote you some time since if you had no objection I would take the money after paying your debts and purchase some articles for sister Margaret. I waited until yesterday for answer and decided not to wait any longer as I was going to Piqua. Supposing you would be glad to do anything for her in your power I purchased a handsome shawl and breast pin enclosing our dear mother’s hair for her and some other small articles she had need of. Write to me soon and tell me if I have done what is proper. Good bye and believe me your affectionate sister.
Elizabeth Jones
AR Johnston

John Johnston to AR Johnston, Columbus Ohio Dec. 20, 1834
Elizabeth had the great misfortune to loose her only daughter and namesake by the cholera somewhere about the beginning of the last month. Being the third child she has buried her health since has been bad, but the last account she was recovering from the effects of her trouble.

Stephen Johnston to John Johnston July 19th, 1847
I was desirous that Sister Elizabeth should have joined us. I believe that these baths, with the use of the Sulfurous waters afterwards, would have done her great service.

 

Died 19 November 1878 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio from her Elizabeth Jones page on Find A Grave.

Johnston, John

Our next stop in the Johnston Cemetery is the Johnston Family area. We will start with John Johnston himself. John...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Friday, June 5, 2015

June 15, 2015 and July 8, 2017 post with photo on Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

Our next stop in the Johnston Cemetery is the Johnston Family area. We will start with John Johnston himself.

John Johnston was born on March 25th, 1775 in County Fermanagh, Ireland. He came to America at age 11 and settled in Pennsylvania, where he remained until the age of 16 when he entered the mercantile trade and began to transport supplies to the various forts on the frontier. During these journeys he first 'laid eyes' on the land known as Upper Piqua, near the Great Miami river in present day Piqua, Ohio. He 'determined' to have it for his own, and kept this promise to himself some 12 years later when, in 1804, he purchased the land. At the time Johnston was serving as an Indian Factor for the US Government, operating a trading post in Fort Wayne in the Indian Territory (now Fort Wayne, IN). Later Johnston became the Federal Indian Agent at the fort. He continued to serve in Indiana until 1811, when he retired to his beloved Upper Piqua farm to become a 'gentleman farmer'.

John Johnston's days of peace and quiet were short. Less than a year after he and his growing family moved into the Upper Piqua farm, in June of 1812, war broke out. The US government needed someone in Ohio with experience with both Indians and soldiers to act as their agent, and Johnston was the perfect candidate. John Johnston became the Indian Agent for the Shawnee in 1812, and for the Wyandot and Seneca tribes in 1816. He also handled the Lenape or Delaware during this time. Johnston's role in Ohio during the War of 1812 was crucial. By the strength of his character he earned the trust of the various Indian tribes, and this trust allowed him to keep the peace during this turbulent time.

After the war ended, the Upper Piqua agency continued until 1829. At that time there was a change of administration in Washington. As Andrew Jackson's Democrats took charge, those - like John Johnston - who were of the Whig party lost their jobs. By 1830 the Upper Piqua Indian Agency had ended, though Native Americans continued for years to come to the farm for aid and the company of their old friend.

John Johnston had many other interests, including farming, education, and the advancement of the state of Ohio, Miami County in particular. In 1825 he became one of Ohio's Canal Commissioners, and was responsible along with the others on the commission for choosing the route the Miami & Erie Canal would take through Ohio. He was on the traveling board of West Point Military Academy, and was one of the founding members of Kenyon College. Johnston was also a president and contributing member of the Cincinnati Historical and Philosophical Society.

John Johnston died in February of 1861, one month before the Civil War broke out. His grave stone is inscribed with these words:

John Johnston b. 3-25-1775, d. 2-18-1861.

Served the U.S. in various

important trusts for a period of forty years.

By his own desire, lies buried here
Close by the side of his beloved wife,
Rachel, hoping to rise together at the
Resurrection of the Just,
Life's labor done, securely laid
In this their last retreat.
Unheeded o'er their silent dust
The storms of life shall beat. 

 

  1. Their honeymoon consisted of an app. 850 mile, two and a half month trip from Pennsylvania to Fort Wayne where John Johnston was to be a Factor for the government, meaning he would run a store where he handled trade with the Indians. On September 4, 1802 goods were purchased and forwarded for the Factory. They came by way of New York, Albany, Buffalo, Lake Erie, and the Maumee River. Their arrival was delayed until May 4 and 12th of the following year. Very few sales took place that year. Total value of this shipment was $13,320. From July 12, 2017 post on Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook.
  2. Their first 4 children, of 15, were the first all-white children to be born at Fort Wayne before Indiana became a state in 1816. From John Johnston (Indian agent) on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
  3. In 1811 he transferred to the new Indian agency at Piqua, Ohio. His Johnston Farm and Indian Agency is a local attraction and posts photos and stories on Facebook.
  4. July 1, 1802 John Johnston was appointed Government Factor in Fort Wayne with pay of $1000 per year and three rations a day, plus $365 for subsistence paid from at the Factory from trade. That same year Little Turtle traveled to Washington to speak with President Jefferson. William Wells traveled with the Turtle and translated for him. Copied from discussion with drawing and key of locations around the old fort posted July 4, 2017 on Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook.
  5. September 21, 2017 Facebook post: Johnston 101 lesson post discusses about 3,000 Indians on March 25, 1814 order for necessaries near Fort Wayne.
  6. October 5, 2014 post discusses Polly (or Mary) Chatalie Native American girl living with the family that likely was living with the Johnston family in Fort Wayne and traveled with the family in 1811 to Ohio. Apparently she lived 'in' the Johnston family, not as a servant but as more of an 'adopted' member of it. Polly was the daughter of Neebosh (see image below), a minor Pottawatomie chief. Her mother was Keeshwa. She later went on to marry a man by the name of Parent and eventually came into her own with money given to her in lieu of land by the government. Polly was in her 50s when she died.
  7. Lots of posts by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook that mention Fort Wayne .
  8. Lots of Facebook post about the Johnson Cemetery on Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook.
  9. John Johnston on Find A Grave.
  10. John Johnston and the Friends: A Midwestern Indian Agent's Relationship with Quakers in the Early 1800s Max L. Carter, Quaker History, Vol. 78, No. 1 (Spring 1989), pp. 37-47 (11 pages), Published By: Friends Historical Association at jstor.org

John Johnston carried on a fairly regular correspondence with Dr. Drake, the foremost physician in the western frontier...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Monday, April 8, 2024

Monday, April 8, 2024 post by the Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

John Johnston carried on a fairly regular correspondence with Dr. Drake, the foremost physician in the western frontier for a number of years. Dr. Drake is mostly remembered for founding the Medical College of Ohio in 1819. The school merged with the University of Cincinnati and today is the UC College of Medicine. Drake was also the first Cincinnati historian.

We thought a mention of the sun from one of Mr. Johnston's letters would be appropriate for 2024's eclipse day. Apparently, Mr. Johnston was trying to keep out of the sun, though we are sure he would have been watching today! [ see 2024 total eclipse ]

John Johnston to Dr. DC Drake December 3 1811 Fort Wayne "My thermometer at the Piqua stands in the shade in a large open Porch attached to my House. I had two boarded roofs between the thermometer and the sun."

Image: Johann Christian Schoeller painted this scene depicting crowds of people viewing the July 8, 1842, total solar eclipse over Vienna, Austria. Johann Christian Schoeller (Artist), Sonnenfinsternis, 8. Juli 1842, 1842, Wien Museum

Johnston, Rachel Hoping Robinson

1785-1840.

On July 15, 1802, John Johnston and Rachel Robinson eloped to Lancaster and were married by the Rev. Gotthilf Heinrich...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Saturday, July 8, 2017

Saturday, July 8, 2017 post by the Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

On July 15, 1802, John Johnston and Rachel Robinson eloped to Lancaster and were married by the Rev. Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg, a Lutheran minister. Peter Muhlenberg (who was first thought to have performed the marriage) was the brother of the minister. Their honeymoon consisted of an app. 850 mile, two and a half month trip from Pennsylvania to Fort Wayne where John Johnston was to be a Factor for the government, meaning he would run a store where he handled trade with the Indians. He was reputed to be fair and honest, and the Indians came to respect him. Out of the two and a half months, John and Rachel spent over two weeks with his mother at his brother James’ home in the Tuscarora Valley in PA.

February 22, 2016 and April 23, 2016 posts show a pair of blue and white porcelain plates stating: According to family tradition the plate belonged to Rachel Robinson Johnston's grandmother, who was also named Rachel, and were passed from generation to generation to the daughter bearing that name. Most likely the plates belonged to Mrs. Johnston previous to her 1802 wedding. If they belonged to her grandmother, it is likely that they date to the late 18th century (225 to 250 years old).

From the Johnston Family Bible located at Johnston Farm, Piqua OH Transcribed May 2003 by Marla Fair On Rachel...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Thursday, February 9, 2017

Rachel J. Robinson, wife of John Johnston, arrived at Fort Wayne in 1802 where she would became the mother of the first all-white children born at Fort Wayne. She later moved with her husband to Ohio and died at Upper Piqua, Ohio July 24, 1840 in the 56th year of her age. “In early times my father was appointed as s. factor at Fort Wayne Indiana. Thither he took my mother, a young girl of sixteen, who for his sake abandoned the ease and refinement of the city of Philadelphia to abide with him in the wilds of the west. She traveled the whole distance, 1000 miles on horseback. At Fort Wayne she was a light in the path of the ladies of the garrison whose vices she reproved without hesitation, and while taking on herself the task of a censor, she avoided making herself odious; so kind was her heart that everyone, the soldiers not excepted, loved her. Copied from the Family Record shown in a

July 24, 2018 re-post of a February 9, 2017 post by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook

From the Johnston Family Bible located at Johnston Farm, Piqua OH Transcribed May 2003 by Marla Fair

On Rachel Johnston’s death -

“Our mother, Rachel J. Robinson, died at Upper Piqua July 24, 1840 in the 56th year of her age. My brothers and sisters and myself were thus deprived of our mother, and our father of his chief solace and companion. More than forty years had they lived together in peace and harmony, a beautiful illustration of love and virtue.

“In early times my father was appointed as s. factor at Fort Wayne Indiana. Thither he took my mother, a young girl of sixteen, who for his sake abandoned the ease and refinement of the city of Philadelphia to abide with him in the wilds of the west. She traveled the whole distance, 1000 miles on horseback. At Fort Wayne she was a light in the path of the ladies of the garrison whose vices she reproved without hesitation, and while taking on herself the task of a censor, she avoided making herself odious; so kind was her heart that everyone, the soldiers not excepted, loved her.

“A thousand incidents could be related exhibiting her great moral firmness, but her utility in the community where she lived is best proof of her loss.” 

See her Find A Grave page.

RACHEL ROBINSON JOHNSTON 1785 — 1840 at Dayton Pioneers.

Johnston, Rebecca

Since we began posting information on the Johnston's children as of September 10th or so, with Margaret, we did not want...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Friday, September 26, 2014

September 26, 2014post by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

Born September 03, 1805, the second child of John and Rachel Johnston, at Fort Wayne in the Indian Territory, died 26 April 1808 from her Find A Grave page.

Since we began posting information on the Johnston's children as of September 10th or so, with Margaret, we did not want to neglect the only Johnston child to die in infancy who was born prior to our first posting.

REBECCA (I) JOHNSTON

John and Rachel Johnston's second child, Rebecca, was born September 03, 1805 at Fort Wayne in the Indian Territory (present day Fort Wayne, IN). Like her sister, Elizabeth, it can be assumed that Rebecca was born in the safety of one of the fort's blockhouses, though this is not known for certain. Of all the Johnstons' children we know the least about Rebecca. According to the family Bible, she died April 26th, 1807 at the tender age of 2 years, 7 months and 23 days. Fort Wayne, like any far-flung frontier outpost, was filled with sickness, or what were known as 'billious' fevers. In a letter dated 1804, John Johnston states that ‘for twelve months I had it with scarcely any interruption, every summer it is looked for as regular as the season comes. Nothing but my poverty and the circumstances of the Secretary of War having placed me here would have induced me to continue at this place on account of its unhealthiness.’ Another letter of the same time relates that his wife, Rachel, has also been ill. Most likely, the baby, Rebecca, died of one of these fevers.

When one studies the past, it quickly becomes apparent that the death of a child was not an uncommon thing. In fact, it was to be expected. The average for the era the Johnston's lived in was that half of a family's children would die under the age of six. So did that make the loss any easier to accept than it is today? A letter of John Johnston's recently found and transcribed seems to answer that question. It is written to his daughter, Mary Reynolds, and dated 1852. After speaking of the recent burial of her brothers Robinson and Stephen, and of her younger sister, Margaret (all of whom died within three years of each other in the 1840s), John states: 'All my loved dead are there now in one enclosure, except that dear child who died at Fort Wayne 50 years ago, and which I once endeavored in vain to recover, the War of 1812 having obliterated all localities.' years had passed, but John Johnston still regretted having to leave Rebecca behind.

There is a marker in the family cemetery with Rebecca's name on it. In this way, John Johnston made certain his eldest daughter, brief as her life was, would never be forgotten.

There were also posts on September 12, 2015, February 20, 2017has tombstone photo, July 26, 2017 and March 23, 2022.

Johnston, Rosanna

4. ROSANNA JOHNSTON Rosanna Johnston was born in Fort Wayne on July 2nd, 1809. Her 1844 obituary states ‘the deceased...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Wednesday, February 22, 2017

February 22, 2017 post by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

4. ROSANNA JOHNSTON

Rosanna Johnston was born in Fort Wayne on July 2nd, 1809. Her 1844 obituary states ‘the deceased had been as child of affliction from infancy’. There is no record of what ‘affliction’ Rosanna suffered, but she was not so severely disabled as to be prevented from traveling and entering into other activities with her sisters. Toward the end of her life she suffered epileptic fits. Rosanna died suddenly at home on August 11, 1844. She was 35.

John Johnston to AR Johnston, Columbus, Ohio Feb’y 3, 1831
Rosanna and John has not been well lately. The former has been disturbed with a kind of fits.

John Johnston to Jefferson Patterson Tuesday August 13, 1844
She done almost all the milking, churning, scrubbing, etc. My poor good tender-hearted child.

Ibid.
After leaving you on Monday and proceeding about 5 miles this side of Dayton, I met a messenger going in pursuit of me, with the melancholy intelligence that my poor afflicted child, Rosanna, was dead. She went to bed as usual on Sunday night and was found lifeless in her bed in the morning. I suppose she must have perished in one of those spasmodic fits to which she has been of late years subject. God for wise and holy purposes has doubtless taken her from the trouble to come. Ever since the death of her dear and most excellent mother, she has led a life of misery. No one to look to her wants and watch over her imperfections.
Silhouette is generic. Other image is of Rosanna's burial place.

Johnston, Stephen

Stephen Johnston was born April 02, 1803 in Fort Wayne, IN during the time his father, John, served as United States...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Wednesday, June 17, 2015 post by the Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

Stephen Johnston was born April 02, 1803 in Fort Wayne, IN during the time his father, John, served as United States Factor to the Indians. It is likely Stephen was born in one of the fort's blockhouses as his sister, Elizabeth, was years later, though we have no proof of this.

Stephen Johnston was 8 years old at the time the family moved to the farm at Upper Piqua. Stephen, as eldest son, would have had to grow up quickly and to shoulder adult responsibilites at a young age. This may explain why he entered the navy - his chosen career - at a much older date than most.

Stephen Johnston left home in 1823 at the age of 20 to join the United States Navy. His early years as a midshipman found him patrolling America's coasts. In 1830, just before being promoted to lieutenant, he took a trip to Russia. In 1838 Stephen Johnston and Elizabeth Clark Anderson were married in Louisville, KY. Elizabeth Clark Anderson was the great-niece of George Rogers Clark. A short time later the couple were parted when Stephen’s naval career resumed.

Stephen Johnston was appointed First Lieutenant of the ship Columbus, the flagship of the East India Squadron, under the command of Commodore Biddle. From 1846 to 1848 the Columbus traveled to China and Japan and was instrumental in beginning trade with both nations. Some time during this voyage, Stephen took ill. The nature of his illness is unknown, though the symptoms mimicked tuberculosis. Stephen was sent to the Sulphur Springs in Virginia in hopes of improving his health, but his condition continued to disintegrate and he died in Louisville Kentucky in 1848 at the age of 45.

Stephen and his wife had three daughters. Nell died in infancy. Hebe and Elizabeth (known as Lily) both lived and married.

Stephen's tombstone:
Lieutenant Stephen Johnston of the U.S. Navy, son of John and Rachel Johnston, born at Fort Wayne Aug. 2, 1803, died at Louisville Ky. April 2, 1848. Entered the navy 1828 (sic). Had seen much service. His last cruise was in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, as first lieutenant of the Columbus of 90 guns. He took his sickness at Japan, and reached his native shore in time to die. His remains were removed and deposited here 4-15-1852. 

1. STEPHEN JOHNSTON Stephen Johnston was born April 02, 1803 in Fort Wayne, IN during the time his father, John,...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Saturday, February 18, 2017

Saturday, February 18, 2017 post by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

1. STEPHEN JOHNSTON

Stephen Johnston was born April 02, 1803 in Fort Wayne, IN during the time his father, John, served as United States Factor to the Indians. At the time, the Johnstons lived in the Factor's House near the fort, which was a two story building. The family occupied the upper level. Cooks, interpreters and Indians occupied the lower floor. It is likely Stephen was born in one of the fort's blockhouses as his sister, Elizabeth, was years later, though we have no proof of this. Fort Wayne at the time was a typical frontier post replete with natives, soldiers, traders and trappers and it may have been deemed safer for a woman to give birth within the fort itself. Fort Wayne Gateway of the West 1802 – 1813: Garrison Orderly Books Indian Agency Account Books, 1927, is filled with references to court-martialed officers, brawls, and duels being fought in the streets. It must have been an exciting if dangerous world for a young boy to grow up in.

... paragraphs repeat from 2015 ...

For the next few years, Stephen was stationed in the states and had some hopes of obtaining a position that would keep him permanently on land. According to a letter written by his father, John, these hopes were futile. The men of the family were committed Whigs, John remarked, and, as such, out of favor with those in power. Shortly after this, Stephen received orders to report to sea for what would prove to be his final voyage.

... paragraphs repeat from 2015 ...

Stephen Johnston to John Johnston, May 10, 1833

Partly owing to my time being much employed, and partly to our sailing sooner than I had expected, I did not write you from Norfolk. All the ladies is (sic) seasick which circumstances does not make them more beautiful or interesting. I like the ladies on shore everywhere but at sea, with my will, not one ever should get afloat.

Stephen Johnston to AR Johnston, Brooklyn, May 2, 1841

We this morning received the letter which I send you now bringing the melancholy intelligence of the death of our Poor sister Rebecca at a time when her hopes and wishes for the future were excited to the highest degree…. In a few short months we as a family have been called upon to mourn the departure of two of our nearest relatives, a melancholy event that has not taken place in the same circle for the thirty three years proceeding…. Within the range of my knowledge I do not now recollect an instance when a family had been so highly favoured by kind Providence by the absence of death among its members as our own.

On April (or possibly August 03) 1803 John and Rachel Johnston’s first child, Stephen, was born in Fort Wayne in the...

Posted by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Wednesday, April 3, 2024

Wednesday, April 3, 2024 post by Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook:

On April (or possibly August 03) 1803 John and Rachel Johnston’s first child, Stephen, was born in Fort Wayne in the Indiana territory. According to the book ‘Headwaters of the Maumee’, Stephen was the first white child born in the fort.

⚓️

Stephen was eventually commissioned a first lieutenant in the Navy. On Commodore James Biddle’s ship, the U.S.S. Columbus, he took part in missions that took the massive ship to China and Japan during the opening of negotiations with both countries. He took ill there and returned home in the spring of 1846.

⚓️

After two years of illness and many futile treatments, Stephen died in Louisville, KY on April 02, 1848, age 44. He was re-interred in Johnston Cemetery on April 15, 1852 with full military honors. Stephen married Elizabeth Clarke Anderson, niece of George Rogers Clark and had two daughters, Hebe and Lily.

See more in 1. February 18, 2017 post, his tombstone photo June 17, 2015, on Johnston Farm & Indian Agency on Facebook. See Find A Grave memorial.

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Johnston, Russell K.

86, of Monroeville, Indiana passed away at 6:58 p.m. on Saturday, March 23, 2013 at Lutheran Hospital of Indiana. He was born on February 16, 1927 in Lima, Ohio to the late Paul R. Johnston and the late Hazel I. (Stevenson) Johnston. He married Helen J. Wagner on July 8, 1949 in Morganfield, Kentucky and she passed away on March 29, 2004. A baseball coach, he was recently inducted into the Indiana Baseball Hall of Fame. He is survived by daughter, Kathy “Koce” Johnston of Fort Wayne, Indiana; son, Randy P. (Patti) Johnston of Angola, Indiana; daughter, Tracy L. (Mark) Lester of Monroeville, Indiana; twelve grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a sister, Jean F. Barkley Leavitt and a half-brother, Harold Johnston. From his Zwick & Jahn Funeral Home obituary.

Jones Eighth Annual Family Reunion

Near Monroeville in September 3, 1919 Fort Wayne News and Sentinel

Jordan, Rev. Ternae

During his 15 years in Fort Wayne, Jordan was pastor of Greater Progressive Baptist Church – and much more. Was in the story Where are they now? Success follows former area newsmakers to their new locales by the editorial page staff published January 6, 2013 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.

Jordan, Justin

South Side High School graduate, served as a graphics production assistant in the 2015 Oprah Winfrey film, “Selma.” His wife, Charity, an aspiring actress and Atlanta native, landed the role of Viola Lee Jackson. Read more in Work on 'Selma' a blessing for city native by Paul Wyche published January 9, 2015 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.

Jordan, Vernon

August 15, 1935 – March 1, 2021. The CNN (Cable News Network) on their first broadcast June 1, 1980 at 6 p.m., was live in about a million and a half U.S. households covering the shooting of Civil Rights leader Vernon Jordan in Fort Wayne. President Jimmy Carter visited him in his room at Parkview Hospital. See Jim Walton: CNN at 30. "On May 29, 1980, civil rights leader and National Urban League chairman Vernon Jordan, Jr., was walking with a white woman when he was wounded by sniper fire in a Fort Wayne parking lot. A few months later, avowed racist and serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin was arrested in Kentucky for armed robbery. A lead suggested that Franklin might be linked to the Jordan shooting. Indianapolis agents studied Franklin’s handwriting and found similar styles in alias signatures from motel registration cards. The FBI Laboratory corroborated the handwriting match; however, Franklin denied involvement and was acquitted of the charges. Nevertheless, 14 years later, Franklin admitted shooting Jordan." formerly posted on Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana with a photograph. Also mentioned in A Brief History 1980s and 1990s The FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation Indianapolis Division web page. Also see Vernon Jordan on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. See The shooting of Vernon Jordan Former Fort Wayne Mayor Win Moses recalls Dr. Jeffrey Towles’ life saving role by William Bryant Rozier published February 25, 2016 on Frost Illustrated now on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.

Joyner, Deborah

FWPD photo
FWPD photo

February 22, 2019 Facebook post by the Fort Wayne Police Department stated: Continuing our recognition of Black Officers during Black History Month we honor the first female black Captain of the Fort Wayne Police Department;Captain Deborah Joyner. Captain Joyner was commissioned on September 25, 1981. During her career she served as an Officer in the Southeast Division and as a detective in the Vice/Narcotics Division and Juvenile Affairs Division of the Detective Bureau. She was promoted to Sergeant in June 1999 and served in the Southeast Division She was promoted to Captain in January 2014 and served in the Community Relations Division until her retirement in September 2018.

Joyner, Michael

FWPD photo
FWPD photo

June 7, 2019 as Public Information Officer and face of the Fort Wayne Police Department, he officially retired with over 20 years of service to the community. Several photos were posted June 7, 2019 by the Fort Wayne Police Department on Facebook.

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