People of Allen County, Indiana

Philo Taylor Farnsworth

See the Farnsworth House where he lived in Fort Wayne from 1948-1968 at 734 E. State Boulevard on the corner of St. Joseph and East State Boulevards.

Saturday, June 15, 2024 video post by PBS Fort Wayne on Facebook:

Did you know Fort Wayne was once home to a pioneer in the invention of the television?! 📺

#FunFactFriday #Farnsworth #History #FortWayne

FFF_Farnsworth and the Olympics

Getting ready to watch the Olympics? Or just watching any live sports event? It's thanks in part to Philo T. Farnsworth that we're able to watch! #FunFactFriday #NowYouKnow #Olympics

Posted by PBS Fort Wayne on Friday, June 28, 2024

Friday, June 28, 2024 post by PBS Fort Wayne on Facebook:

Getting ready to watch the Olympics? Or just watching any live sports event? It's thanks in part to Philo T. Farnsworth that we're able to watch!

#FunFactFriday#NowYouKnow

PHILO FARNSWORTH: the most famous man you never heard of - 10 minute YouTube video by his great-granddaughter Jessica Farnsworth on TheHistoryofTV.

The story of television, the life of Philo T. Farnsworth by Everson, George, 1885-, Publication date [1949] on Archive.org.

Philo invented television according to most American sources. He lived in Fort Wayne from 1948-1968, his home 734 E. State Boulevard is at the corner of St. Joseph and East State Blvd with an Indiana Historical Bureau marker erected in 1992. May 26, 2022 discussion on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook. See January 1, 2014 Home of Philo T. Farnsworth Allen County Marker Text Review Report. The house, built about 1905, was designed by Joel Roberts Ninde, one of Indiana’s first female house designers. Read more in Dwelling on accomplishments Farnsworth house built by, for innovators by Rosa Salter Rodriguez published July 12, 2009 in the The Journal Gazette newspaper. Philo was born in a log cabin in 1906, at age 14 conceived of television while plowing farm fields, then invented electronic television sending his first signal September 7, 1927 at his San Francisco lab, covered in the November 1940 Popular Science magazine, honored with the Philo T. Farnsworth Corporate Achievement Award. He moved to Fort Wayne and opened a television and radio manufacturing plant called the Farnsworth Television and Radio Corporation. There, he established a lab, where he devised a “fusion reaction tube” and reportedly achieved self-sustaining fusion. A comment to a September 27, 2019 post by the Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook said there is a Farnsworth museum in the lobby of the L3Harris building on Lima/Cook with several of his TVs and notebooks. A December 27, 2022 discussion on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook stated that Farnsworth used a non-mechanical process for tv. This involved scanning vs a spinning wheel. The idea was born from watching farmers go back and forth (raster scan) across the fields as they plowed.

June 14, 2023 post by History Scotland on Facebook:

John Logie Baird, the man who created the world's first successful publicly demonstrated television, died on this day in 1946. #history

Television pioneer John Logie Baird died - On this day in history

 

John Logie Baird on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia says the Scottish engineer is credited as inventor of the world's first practical, publicly demonstrated television system, and also the world's first fully electronic colour television tube. Logie Awards in Australia on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. See the Baird Television web page. He is often known as "the father of television." In his laboratory on October 2, 1925 Baird successfully transmitted the first television picture with a greyscale image and demonstrated a viable system January 26, 1926 using radio or ordinary telephone lines. In England in 1878, John Loggie Baird, a Scottish amateur scientist, successfully transmitted the first TV picture, [28 years before Farnsworth was born in 1906] after years of work, in 1926, with his mechanical system. Baird’s system used a mechanical camera consisting of a large spinning disc, with a spiral of holes that Paul Nipkow had developed in 1884. This old mechanical technology was quickly replaced by superior electronic television. Copied from Television Invention | Kids Work! at KnowItAll.org.
  1. SEEKING PHILO FARNSWORTH. At the top of his wish list? A set made by electronic-television pioneer Philo Farnsworth in the late 1920s or early 1930s. “Only three still survive as far as we know and they’re all already in other museums,” McVoy said. “If a fourth ever shows up, we’d go to our donors and would be able to get it.” Copied from This Ohio museum shows that TV is older than you might think. STEVE WARTENBERG Associated Press, July 3, 2023 CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15.
  2. September 1, 2021 post by the Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook:

    Philo T. Farnsworth conceived of the idea for electronic television in the middle of an Idaho potato field at just 13 years old. At age 19, he produced the first functional prototype of his idea. For nearly three decades following that, Farnsworth worked to bring his invention to the American home but was stymied every step of the way by financial, legal, and technological problems.

    Hear the whole story in the new Talking Hoosier History episode: https://wp.me/p7f1qx-2ja

  3. January 7, 2019 post by the Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook:

    On January 7, 1927, inventor Philo T. Farnsworth applied for his first television patent. He conceived of the idea for electronic television at the age of fourteen and brought his conception to fruition in 1927 with his first electronic transmission.

    In 1939, he established the Farnsworth Television and Radio Company in Fort Wayne, eventually operating seven television and radio manufacturing plants in Indiana. Farnsworth also established a laboratory in Fort Wayne, where he reportedly achieved self-sustaining fusion.

    The image below shows Farnsworth’s patent, courtesy of Google Patents. You can see the whole patent here: US1773980A US Grant

    Learn more about Farnsworth with the #IndianaHistoryBlog“THE DAMNED THING WORKS!:” Philo T. Farnsworth & the Invention of Television 

  4. January 7, 2019 post by the Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook:

    On January 7, 1927, inventor Philo T. Farnsworth applied for his first television patent. He conceived of the idea for electronic television at the age of fourteen and brought his conception to fruition in 1927 with his first electronic transmission. In 1939, he established the Farnsworth Television and Radio Company in Fort Wayne, eventually operating seven television and radio manufacturing plants in Indiana. Farnsworth also established a laboratory in Fort Wayne, where he reportedly achieved self-sustaining fusion. Learn more at: “THE DAMNED THING WORKS!:” Philo T. Farnsworth & the Invention of Television

    Image courtesy of the J. Willard Marriott Digital Library, University of Utah.

  5. January 6, 2023 post by I Grew Up in Mortdale 2223 on Facebook: [fun comments on Facebook to this post from a suburb in southern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia]

    📺 #OnThisDay 7 September 1927, American television pioneer Philo T. Farnsworth, age 21, succeeded in transmitting an image through purely electronic means by using a device called an image dissector. When Philo T. Farnsworth was 13, he envisioned a contraption that would receive an image transmitted from a remote location, the television. Farnsworth submitted a patent in January 1927, when he was 19, and began building and testing his invention that summer. He used an "image dissector" (the first television camera tube) to convert the image into a current, and an "image oscillite" (picture tube) to receive it. On this day his tests bore fruit. When the simple image of a straight line was placed between the image dissector and a carbon arc lamp, it showed up clearly on the receiver in another room. His first tele-electronic image was transmitted on a glass slide in his laboratory. The New York World’s Fair showcased the television in April 1939, and soon afterward, the first televisions went on sale to the public.

  6. September 3, 2023 post by the U.S. Census Bureau on Facebook:

    On September 3, 1928, a 22-year-old inventor named Philo T. Farnsworth transmitted the first #television broadcast. 📺

    Development slowed during World War II, but Americans quickly adopted the technology in the 1950s and 1960s. Today, #CensusData show that nearly every home in the U.S. owns at least one #TV, making it one of the most influential innovations in history.

    Learn more about Farnsworth and the history of television: U.S. Census Bureau History: Philo Farnsworth and the Invention of Television

    #CensusHistory #OTD #OnThisDay #OnThisDayInHistory

    Did you know there is a Philo T. Farnsworth Statue given to the National Statuary Hall Collection by Utah in 1990 in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Washington, D.C.?

    Philo T Farnsworth statue
  7. September 27, 2019 post by the Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook

    On September 27, 1927, inventor of electronic television, Philo T. Farnsworth, transmitted the first electronic television image at his San Francisco lab. He moved to Fort Wayne and opened a television and radio manufacturing plant called the Farnsworth Television and Radio Corporation. There, he established a lab, where he devised a “fusion reaction tube” and reportedly achieved self-sustaining fusion.

    Learn more about Farnsworth with the #IndianaHistoryBloghttp://bit.ly/2pxmuM0

    The image below, showing Farnsworth with an early television camera, is courtesy of the University of Utah.

    A 2016 comment stated: we still have a Farnsworth museum in the lobby of the L3Harris building on Lima/Cook with several of his TVs and notebooks. There are several photographs taken at the museum in the article L3Harris Fort Wayne advances space technology Nathan Gidley, September 5, 2023 at CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15. The article says L3Harris moved from California

    L3Harris has a Farnsworth Innovation Center on the local campus which provides the space for the company’s missile defense satellite programs. It will support engineering, integration, testing and program management and brings the total size of the L3Harris campus to 150,000 square feet, the company said. By scaling up, the company is set to deliver future missile defense satellite programs. from the article Sept. 16 - L3Harris expanding in Fort Wayne, adding jobs for growing satellite work Lisa Esquivel Long, September 16, 2021 on Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly.

  8. Philo T. Farnsworth: Father of Television including transcript at Talking Hoosier History at IN.gov.
  9. Modern Mechanix magazine
    Modern Mechanix photo
  10. Perfected Television article by Dean S. Jennings in November 1934 Modern Mechanix
  11. Making TV sets for all America - Philo T. Farnsworth, the Father of Television, astonished his high school science teacher in 1922 when, at age 15, he described logically with diagrams how images could be transmitted and received electronically over great distances. By 1927, he first transmitted a television image over cable, and, in 1928, he could demonstrate the first completely electronic television system. Throughout the 1930s, in San Francisco and Philadelphia, he perfected the television tube technology. When Farnsworth came to Fort Wayne in 1939, he was seeking a first-rate cabinet and electronic shop, which he found at the Capehart Automatic Phonograph Co. Here, he began the first mass production of TV sets in the U.S. Although the television market was not profitable (the first TV station in Fort Wayne, WKJG, Channel 33, did not come on the air until 1953), numerous wartime technological advancements, particularly in radar and early missile- guidance systems, were made by the company, then Farnsworth Television Co., between 1941 and 1946. ITT Aerospace Optical Division bought Farnsworth in 1949. Copied from City was home for many inventions by Michael Hawfield fromCityscapes - People & Places series of articles from the archives of The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  12. "I invented electronic television" around the 13:20 mark of I've Got A Secret - Philo Farnsworth, Buster Keaton 1957 Mar 21, 2013 by TheHistoryofTV on YouTube.
    The only televised appearance by the inventor of television Philo T. Farnsworth. They couldn't guess who he was, but gave him a carton of Winstons and eighty bucks. Also an appearance by Buster Keaton and Garry Moore

  13. Elma Farnsworth on Philo Farnsworth on "I've Got a Secret" - EMMYTVLEGENDS.ORG May 16, 2016 by FoundationINTERVIEWS on YouTube
    For her full interview, see http://emmytvlegends.org/interviews/p...
    "In 1957, he was a mystery guest on the TV quiz show I've Got A Secret on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. He fielded questions from the panel of celebrities as they unsuccessfully tried to guess his secret ("I invented electronic television."). For stumping the panel, he received $80 and a carton of Winston cigarettes."

  14. Elma Farnsworth Interview Part 1 of 12 - TelevisionAcademy.com/Interviews September 4, 2009 by FoundationINTERVIEWS on YouTube

  15. Numerous web sites like: Farnsworth Archives official site - Farnovision - Wikipedia - AncestryMagazine.com, Inducted 1984 Invent Now Hall of Fame, a 1999 Time Magazine article and 1999 MIT Inventor of the Week.
  16. Philo T. Farnsworth material at the Allen County Public Library.
  17. Several books on his life including "Distant Vision" by his wife Elma G. Farnsworth.
  18. Tech Savy Lender shows his Fort Wayne home.
  19. The U.S. Post Office issued a stamp in 1983 shown in a September 25, 1983 The Journal Gazette newspaper article posted November 27, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.
  20. 1957: Honoring inventor Philo T. Farnsworth by Corey McMaken published October 14, 2021 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.
  21. History Center Rescues Farnsworth Artifacts published July 20, 2010 on their History Center Notes & Queries blog.
  22. Science Central promotes the local "Philo T. Farnsworth-ITT Innovation Award."
  23. Internet Archive has several titles on Philo Taylor Farnsworth
  24. The ITT now Harris Corporation building off Cook Road in Industrial Park had a small Farnsworth Museum.
  25. 1955 Capehart & Farnsworth TV ad and 1950's photo of family with TVon the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.
  26. PHILO FARNSWORTH "SMALL SCREEN, BIG DREAMS" part 2 published Sep 7, 2012 by TheHistoryofTV
    Philo T. Farnsworth came up with the original idea for electronic television when he was 14. his is a story of true American Ingenuity. He invented a thousand things and was one of our unsung geniuses. Here in part two from an old PBS documentary, he wins his patent war against RCA, but ironically does not share in the fortunes made on his invention.
  27. Discover the Drama Behind The Farnsworth Invention a play written by Aaron Sorkin highlights a lesser known part of our technological history by Kayleen published March 22, 2012 archived on Internet Archive Wayback Machine originally on Visit Fort Wayne blog."
  28. See Philo T. Farnsworth: The Father of Television Part I published February 14, 2014, Part II published February 21, 2014, and Part III published February 28, 2014 by Nicole Poletika on Marking Hoosier History on the Indiana Historical Bureau blog now on the Marking Hoosier History Archive.
  29. Philo Farnsworth video at Indiana Bicentennial Minute by the Indiana Historical Society and the law firm of Krieg Devault with transcript of Jane Pauley narration.
  30. “If it weren’t for Philo T. Farnsworth, inventor of television, we’d still be eating frozen radio dinners”. Johnny Carson updates with photos from “THE DAMNED THING WORKS!:” Philo T. Farnsworth & the Invention of Television Part I from Today in History blog. Discussed March 14, 2022 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook
  31. May 23, 2017 post by Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook.

    If inventing electronic television at the age of 14 wasn't enough, Philo T. Farnsworth is said to have achieved fusion (possibly self-sustaining, which is unheard of) at his Fort Wayne lab.

    Prior to "bottling a star," an effort for which he was encouraged by Albert Einstein, Farnsworth opened a tv manufacturing plant in the Hoosier city. Learn more about his groundbreaking fusion experiments and how his manufacturing plant revitalized Fort Wayne, especially during WWII:

    with Downtown Fort Wayne and Philo Farnsworth. 

    Philo T. Farnsworth: Conversing with Einstein & Achieving Fusion in Fort Wayne Part II May 23, 2017 by Nicole Poletika on

    Indiana Historical Bureaublog.

  32. Philo T. Farnsworth on Facebook points to The Boy Who Invented Television by Paul Schatzkin.
  33. March 7, 2016 Philo Farnsworth, the father of television in Indiana Bicentennial Minute 10 YouTubefrom the Indiana Bicentennial Commission on Facebook.
  34. YouTubePHILO FARNSWORTH: the most famous man you never heard of - by Jessica Farnsworth published March 27, 2013 by TheHistoryofTV and discussion March 11, 2017 and other Name Searches on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.
  35. His story posted April 27, 2017 on Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook.
  36. Photo of historic marker and house with discussion posted May 9, 2017 on the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.
  37. Farnsworth's company made advancements to wartime technology during WWII by making major developments in radar and early missile guidance systems, from 90 Fun Facts on Facebook from The History Center.
  38. Did Philo T. Farnsworth bottle a star in his Fort Wayne basement laboratory on Pontiac Street? It is possible that in the 1960s the inventor of television achieved what still eludes scientists: self-sustaining fusion. Read Philo T. Farnsworth: The burden of genius by Nicole Poletika published March 1, 2018 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  39. FROM THE ARCHIVES: Television makes its midwest debut at plant of Farnsworth Corporation This was a story which originally appeared in the Fort Wayne News-Sentinel on August 9, 1939 and re-published March 1, 2018 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  40. More on Philo T. Farnsworth - Forgotten Genius Exhibit at the MZTV Museum published Oct 19, 2018 by Everything Zoomer
    We go in depth with an expert on Philo T. Farnsworth, more from Moses Znaimer, Philo's great grandson and the unveiling of the new Forgotten Genius exhibit. Exhibit is on now and running until April 2019. Along with the television artifacts, visitors can also scan QR codes spread throughout the exhibit to watch unique clips related to Farnsworth’s life, including the one and only time Philo himself appeared on television — as a guest on a 1957 episode of the game show I've Got A Secret.
  41. December 29, 2018 was a discussion about knowing Philo and working for his company on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook
  42. Philo T Farnsworth S1 E2 published May 9, 2021 by Indiana Roadside Markers
    Philio T. Farnsworth, inventor of the television made his home in Fort Wayne, Indiana from 1948 to 1967, opening the Farnsworth Radio and Television Corporation there in 1938. IN this episode host, Michael L Harris visits the site of Farnsworth's Fort Wayne home and shares Farnsworth's history.

  43. Radio History - A trip to the local history museum to see the Philo Farnsworth exhibit by Kevin Loughin posted December 23, 2017 on YouTube

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