I Named Places in Allen County, Indiana

Ice Delivery, Inc.

1105 Cass Street, went out of buisness June 10, 1967. It was a consolidation of Consumers, Moran (started in 1860 using horse drawn wagons), and Centlivre ice companies. Home ice delivery was discussed February 24, 2017 and a photo of a July 7, 1967 The Journal Gazette newspaper article was posted and discussed September 24, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook. See images of ice delivery items from the 1800s and early 1900s posted June 21, 2018 by The History Centeron Facebook.

I. Jones Recycling

3651 North Clinton 2008 Street View photo of an empty lot not the current Street View showing Carmax from Google maps

Was located at 3651 North Clinton Street in Fort Wayne, Indiana in an A. M. Strauss designed building originally for Wayne Cooperative Milk Producers. The site occupied approximately 4.5 acres and was situated in a predominantly commercial and residential area. South of the large Glenbrook shopping mall. Four buildings were located on the site. The facility, formerly known as Hanchar Industrial Waste Management and Continental Waste Systems, began operations in 1980 as a waste recovery and reclamation facility, handling waste oils and solvents along with other hazardous wastes. On September 9, 1986, a chemical fire broke out at the site. The local fire department and Hazardous Materials Response Team extinguished the blaze which narrowly missed igniting approximately 525 drums of hazardous materials in an adjoining room. The City then asked for and was granted a restraining order against IJ Recycling, closing the facility. The building was torn down in 1993.

  1. I. Jones Recycling, Inc Settlement Released for Public Comment: March 2004 on IN.gov now on Internet Archive Wayback Machine has the same description as the U.S. Department of the Interior settlement shown below. Not found on the current Indiana Department of Environmental Management site?
  2. I. Jones Recycling Inc. Site at the U.S. Department of the Interior.

    Case Description

    The I. Jones (IJ) site is located at 3651 North Clinton Street in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The site occupies approximately 4.5 acres and is situated in a predominantly commercial and residential area. The site is bordered on the southwest by Ernest Court, on the southeast by a parking lot adjacent to several small businesses, on the north by retail businesses including the large Glenbrook shopping mall, and on the west by a residence. Four buildings are located on the site.

    The facility, formerly known as Hanchar Industrial Waste Management and Continental Waste Systems, began operations in 1980 as a waste recovery and reclamation facility, handling waste oils and solvents along with other hazardous wastes. Over the years, the owner/operators accepted waste from various industrial sources, and accumulated a substantial volume of partially treated and untreated hazardous substances. The facility ceased operations in 1984. While attempts were made to revive the facility, full operation was never achieved. Much of the waste was stored in tanks and drums, and an estimated 400,000 gallons of solvents and waste oils were awaiting treatment when the facility was sold. Some of the treatment methods formerly used on the site included oil/water separation, acid/base neutralization, heavy metal precipitation, and distillation.

    In connection with the proposed sale of the site, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was asked by the Small Business Administration (SBA) to conduct a site assessment following an inventory of the closed facility by Pollution Control Systems in January 1985. The SBA was concerned about potential threats to public health and the environment posed by the large number of drums and tanks at the inoperable facility. The EPA and its Technical Assistance Team (TAT) conducted the inspection on February 25, 1985, and recommended that the current owner activate the sprinkler system, implement security measures, and conduct daily inspections of the facility to detect leaking drums and other unsafe conditions until a new owner took over.

    On December 24, 1985, a ceiling collapsed at the facility and sheared off a valve on a 10,000 gallon tank containing highly chlorinated hazardous ink solvents. Five to six thousand gallons of material were spilled and approximately 1,500 gallons entered the storm sewer system. The EPA investigated the spill on January 3, 1986. IJ Recycling contracted Pollution Control Systems to clean up the spill. Clean up delays and financial problems resulted in some of the material entering the St. Joseph River.

    The State of Indiana obtained an Agreed Entry of a Preliminary Injunction for IJ Recycling on March 22, 1986. This order prevented them from accepting any additional hazardous material until they lowered their existing inventory. On September 9, 1986, a chemical fire broke out at the site. The local fire department and Hazardous Materials Response Team extinguished the blaze which narrowly missed igniting approximately 525 drums of hazardous materials in an adjoining room. The City then asked for and was granted a restraining order against IJ Recycling, closing the facility.

  3. They’re moving a lot of dirt at 3705 N. Clinton, and by early next year the property just south of Glenbrook should be home to the CarMax store Indiana. CarMax, based in Richmond, VA., was founded in 1999 and operates about 195 locations, including Indianapolis and Merrillville, and had sales of more than $17 billion in 2017. A Fortune 500 company, CarMax has an extensive on-line presence and plans to erect a 7,600-square-foot facility on the former I.J. Recycling site. Copied from KEVIN LEININGER: Site of major 1986 fire finally redeveloped; trail and Fire Department concerns exposed published May 11, 2019 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  4. KEVIN LEININGER: Does redevelopment of contaminated sites mean Fort Wayne has learned history’s hard lessons? published December 28, 2017 in The News-Sentinel newspapersays it was the I.J. Recycling plant torn down in 1993 after a chemical reaction forced the evacuation of 3,000 people in a 20-block area September 9, 1986 near Glenbrook Mall leading to a $9 million government-led environmental clean-up. With the help of a $2.3 million city-backed bond, Hanchar Industrial Waste Management converted the former Wayne Dairy Co-op at 3651 N. Clinton St. into a recycling facility before selling to I.J. Recycling in 1985. But when I.J.’s owners declared bankruptcy following the 1986 incident, Allen County government took possession of the property for non-payment of taxes and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took charge of the cleanup, declaring the plant a “superfund” site and spending about $8 million to remove contaminated soil. The EPA later billed GE and other companies millions of dollars because they had sent waste to I.J., and the county spent an additional $800,000 on remediation before it dropped plans to locate a juvenile detention facility there. Finally, in 2005, the county sold the vacant 5.3-acre site to Dar Highlen, whose porch and patio store is across the street, for $600,000. Listed for sale at nearly $1.4 million, it has been on the market ever since...

Indian Reservation

Several were in the Fort Wayne area. Mentioned in a 1904 Fort Wayne News newspaper article posted May 1, 2017 on the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook. See our Indian - Native Americans page.

Indiana State Archives

Website: https://www.in.gov/iara/, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/INStateArchives/, YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/@indianaarchivesandrecordsa9243/

  1. New Indiana archives building planned at former prison site October 21, 2021 at wfyi PBS Indianapolis
  2. New Indiana archives building under consideration at former prison site Casey Smith, Associated Press/Report for America, October 22, 2021 IndyStar.com.
  3. Gov. Holcomb announces site selections for two capital projects, March 15, 2022, - INDIANAPOLIS-Gov. Eric J. Holcomb today announced that sites have been selected for a new state archives building at Events.in.gov.
  4. Construction begins for new Indiana archives building in downtown Indianapolis Gov. Eric Holcomb attended a groundbreaking ceremony for the $102 million facility on Tuesday. August 15, 2023 Indiana Capital Chronicle

September 27, 2021 post by the Indiana Archives and Records Administration on Facebook:

We have exciting changes at the Indiana State Archives!

After years of hard work the new and expanded Digital Archives has a new home! Now called the Research Indiana Indexes, the site includes over 1.36 million names and entries.

Check out the website here: Search Archives Holdings

The Research Indiana Indexes will be regularly updated as additional records are indexed and reviewed.

We want to say a big thank you to all of the dedicated staff and volunteers that made this a reality!

September 14, 2022 post by Indiana State Library on Facebook:

Our new neighbor, the Indiana State Archives, will be located right across the street from the Indiana State Library on the canal. Read more about the building and the project and sign up for updates here: Indiana State Archives Building #Indiana #Archives #building

July 10, 2023 post by Indiana Capital Chronicle on Facebook:

Long-awaited state archives building to turn dirt soon.

A new state archives building is coming to downtown Indianapolis — finally Plans for a new state archives have been in the works since 2015.

July 11, 2023 post by the Indiana Archives and Records Administration on Facebook:

ICYMI:

The Budget Agency officially approved the funding for the new State Archives building!

Read about it here: A new state archives building is coming to downtown Indianapolis — finally Plans for a new state archives have been in the works since 2015.

We are excited for things to get started next month!

#Archives #Indianapolis #NewBuilding #IndianaArchives

August 15, 2023 post by Indiana Archives and Records Administration on Facebook:

It was a beautiful day for our groundbreaking ceremony.

Thank you to everyone who helped make this project a reality!

#Archives #Holcomb #Ratio #StateGovernment #Indianapolis

August 15, 2023 post by Governor Eric Holcomb on Facebook:

It was an honor to take part in the groundbreaking for the new Indiana Archives and Records Administration. This building will house priceless artifacts and documents that tell our #Hoosier story. In its new location, our state’s history will be more accessible for all #Hoosiers.

August 15, 2023 post by Indiana State Library on Facebook:

This morning, Gov. Holcomb, along with state officials and partners, broke ground on the future site of the Indiana State Archives building, set to be completed in 2025. The building will be located across from the Indiana State Library on Ohio St. in downtown Indianapolis. Read more about the building here: https://tinyurl.com/msb3vx6h #Indiana #Archives #groundbreaking

August 15, 2023 post by Friends of the Indiana State Archives on Facebook:

It was exciting to see the kick off for the long awaited new archives building. Mark your calenders for 2025!

January 2, 2024 shared post by the Indiana Archives and Records Administration on Facebook:

January 2, 2024 post by WFYI on Facebook:

Hoosier history at risk! This archivist fights time to save Indiana's past.

A treasure trove of history: The State Archives. Look back on this clip from the Across Indiana achrives to explore how records were kept before the digital era was ushered in. Here, Beatles concert bills mingle with Civil War rolls and Charles Manson's prison file. But time and decay threaten these Hoosier relics. Archivist F. Gerald Handfield fights a valiant battle, preserving these documents before they crumble to dust.

Indiana Archives and Records Administration Indiana Historical Society #Indiana #History #Archives

January 10, 2024 post by the Indiana Archives and Records Administration on Facebook:

Our Executive Director, Chandler Lighty, recently appeared as a guest on Hoosier History Live. Chandler discussed the new building and some landmark Indiana Supreme Court cases. Check out the podcast episode: November 18, 2023 State Archives podcast

Indiana Feed & Seed

Old time pet store, feed mill, and seed seller was downtown. Discussed October 24, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

Indiana Hotel

See Hotel Indiana.

Indiana Institute of Technology

A photo of an etching hand signed by Blake Hughes of the Administration Building at Indiana Institute of Technology erected in 1852 was posted May 31, 2018 for "Throwback Thursday" by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook.

Indiana Magazine of History

Over 300 copies of this quarterly publication are on Archive.org.

Indiana Michigan Power

Supplies electricity to Fort Wayne and northeast Indiana since they purchased the lease in 1990 from Fort Wayne's City Light.

Indiana Road Machine Company

Indiana Road Machinery Rock Crusher Walkaround - Very Similar to my ACME Rock Crusher's Design??? November 23, 2022 Squatch253 YouTube

Incorporated in 1896, owned by John Claus Peters, it was located on the corner of Osage and West Main. Various images discussed December 27, 2023 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook. Page 82 in Fort Wayne, Indiana : a presentation of her resources, achievements and possibilities ... by Gardner, H. W., Publication date 1913 on Archive.org.

Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth - 1913

Fort Wayne State School - renamed in 1931

Fort Wayne Developmental Center - renamed before 1986? closed in 2007

Google map photo from Street View of the 1983 remnant column of The State School building on East State Blvd. There is a newer July 27, 2020 plaque on one side shown on page 66 of the FORT WAYNE MONUMENTS PLAQUES AND MARKERS IN CITY PARKS 2020. The original 1983 plaque with outdated language was removed to a collection at The History Center. Discussed around the 1:19 minute mark is the 1981 decision for the land to become Northside Park with a park administration building dedicated June 4, 1983. The State School administration building was demolished in August 1982, with 1983 dedication of the column around the 1:51 minute mark of The Forgotten PBS documentary.

Google map of the corner of St. Joe and Stellhorn Road 1960s location now the Ivy Tech Community College Fort Wayne campus. The Fort Wayne State Hospital & Training Center aka Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth Cemetery is at the northwest corner of the Purdue Fort Wayne St. Joe Road entrance. Address was 4900 St. Joe Road. As of September 28, 2022 MapCarta still labels the corner as Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center as does Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center on RoadOnMap.com.

1911 Fort Wayne Journal Gazette

1911 - New Hospital Million Dollar Institution - School Feeble-Minded Youth
The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Sunday, March 12, 1911, Page 19, clipped by StanFollisFW, May 14, 2023

The word feeble in online dictionaries is defined as weak, unsatisfactory, or lacking strength. Presentism is a historical term meaning judging past actions by today’s standard. It helps to understand the vocabulary used in the late 19th century is often different than modern times and it is best not to judge the past on our understanding of modern science and social norms. Two examples are this 1873 newspaper article: 1873 - Lunatics Hither - Fort Wayne a Desirable Place for You to Live in and 1873 - A Lunatic at Large both from the Fort Wayne Daily Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Tuesday, Feb 11, 1873, page 4. It helps to understand education in the 19th century was different from modern times with many people illiterate or only attending a few years of school. The first Fort Wayne Community School building opened in 1857, and Fort Wayne High School in 1864. Well into the 20th century is was common for many people to not attend school past 8th grade, often ending their education earlier for various reasons.

Pages 517-518 in The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Taylor, Samuel R., Mrs Publication date 1917, on Archive.org.
Page 517 INDIANA SCHOOL FOR FEEBLE MINDED YOUTH. Page 517 The history of the great state institution known as the Indiana School for Feeble Minded Yotith, a model of its kind, dates from Page 518 the year 1879, when by a legislative act an asylum for feeble minded children was made an adjunct of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' home at Knightstown. In 1887 a separate institution was decided upon and Fort Wayne was chosen as the site, after a lively legislative controversy. The board of trustees, of which E. A. K. Hackett was the president, chose the present location, and in the following year the first appropriation of $50,000 was expended for the site and the erection of the main building. John F. Wing and M. S. Mahurin were the architects of the structure. The present magnificent institution has developed as a result of superior management and the earnest co-operation of the state authorities. The superintendents of the Indiana school from the beginning are John G. Blake, James H. Leonard, Alexander Johnson, Albert E. Carrrol and Dr. George S. Bliss.

A 60 acre property bounded by the Hicksville State Road (now State Street Blvd), Thomasetta (now Kentucky Ave), Charlotte and Parnell Avenues then out in the country in 1890. Designed by Marshall S. Mahurin. By the 1920’s the property housed about 1,600 patients as well as operating nearly 1,000 acres of farmland in Allen County including the property that is now the campus of Purdue and Indiana Universities on Coliseum Blvd. From photo and history by Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and authorposted May, 4, 2017 on Fort Wayne Readerthen posted May 8, 2017 and May 6, 2018 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook. Aka "State School" now Northside Park on State Blvd near North Side High School.

See Fort Wayne Developmental Center and Fort Wayne State Hospital & Training Center aka Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth Cemetery.

See also Allen County Children's Home, Allen County Orphan Home, Allen County Poor Farm, Fort Wayne Children's Home, and St. Vincent Villa Catholic Orphanage.

  1. INDIANA DISABILITY HISTORY TIMELINE at Indiana University has lots of interesting items for Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center search.
  2. The Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth in Fort Wayne opened its doors in 1890 on East State Street, in an area that was, at the time, in the country. The school's campus included the Administration Building, cottages, a school, an industrial arts building, a hospital, and a gymnasium. The vocational arts were divided by gender, with men learning carpentry, agriculture, painting, upholstering and the making of mattresses, shoes and bricks, and the women learning the domestic arts of cleaning, cooking, canning, dressmaking, loom weaving and laundry. Residents came from all over the state. In 1931, the 1130 resident capacity facility housed 172, and had a waiting list of 200. That same year, the legislature changed the school's name to Fort Wayne State School. In 1960, many residents moved to the new site at Stellhorn and St. Joe Roads, but some residents continued to live at the old school for about 20 years. After a number of years in which the State Street campus was inhabited by vagrants and rats, the Administration Building was demolished in 1982 to make way for North Side Park, which became Bob Arnold Northside Park. The Park Department saved a stone archway to leave as memorial to the former residents. These mortality lists are taken from the Annual Reports of the Fort Wayne State School to the Governor, and cover the time period from November 1912 to June 1937. (ACPL call number GC 977.202 F77fmy.) After that time, the reports did not list the deaths. The report includes name, age, date and cause of death, and evaluation grade. Actual death records were created for each individual and are part of the Allen County Death Records. Microfiche copies of the Allen County Death Records to 1932 are held at The Genealogy Center of the Allen County Public Library. Later death records can be obtained from the State Vital Records Office. Among other information, death records could provide birthplace and parents' names, when known. Also provided are burial places. Some deceased residents were buried in their hometowns, others in various cemeteries in Allen County, including the institution's cemetery, located in Section 19 of St. Joseph Township, on the west side of St. Joe Road, between Broyles and Canterbury Boulevards. There is one large stone, dated 1901 to 1967, but the graves were never marked. It is probable that some of those bodies supposedly buried at the school cemetery were instead donated for medical research. Many deceased inmates, however, were buried in other cemeteries or returned to their hometowns for burial. Copied from Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth -- Fort Wayne State School Mortality Lists at The Genealogy Center.
  3. See the Fort Wayne State Hospital & Training Center aka Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth Cemetery on the Purdue Fort Wayne campus.
  4. November 12, 2013 post by the Indiana Genealogical Society on Facebook:

    TUESDAY TIDBIT: The causes of insanity among patients at the Indiana Hospital for the Insane in 1869 included: excessive breastfeeding, masturbation, sunburn, seduction, reading "vile" books, a defective education, and fear of being drafted into the army.

    Source: The annual report of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane for the year ending October 31, 1869. [begins on page 363 as Superintendents Report in the Documentary journal of Indiana 1869, by Indiana. General Assembly, Publication date 1869]

  5. During 1879-1887 the Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children was located on the grounds of the Orphan's Home and the two organizations shared all communal facilities (dining hall, hospital, church, etc.). Complaints concerning the combination of the two homes, particularly by veteran's organizations, led to the transfer of the Asylum to Ft. Wayne in 1887. Copied from Soldiers' and Sailors' Children's home at the Indiana Archives and Records Administration at IN.gov.
  6. Indiana’s second oldest mental health facility opened in 1879 at Knightstown. It was relocated to Fort Wayne in 1890. The first patient admitted that year was an eleven year old boy from Ossian, Wells County. It served mentally retarded children from throughout Indiana until 1939, when its service area was reduced to the northern half of the state. Its mission was expanded to include patients of all ages with other developmental disabilities. Before closure in 2007 the facility had admitted 12162 patients. The center’s admission registers, card index, and a nearly complete set of medical records on microfilm, are at the Indiana State Archives. Copied from Fort Wayne Developmental Center (Fort Wayne State School, Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth, and Asylum for Feeble Minded Children) at Central State Hospital Collection: Index at the Indiana Archives and Records Administration at IN.gov.
  7. The Forgotten: A History of the State Developmental Institutions in Fort Wayne Special | 1h 59m 29s | Video has closed captioning. In 1879 Indiana decided to create an institution for children with mental disabilities. In 1890 a brand-new facility dedicated to this cause was opened. It was located just northeast of the city of Fort Wayne, on what would later become East State Boulevard. Aired: 09/26/22 Rating: TV-14.
    Copied from PBS Fort Wayne and their September 29, 2022 post on Facebook. Around the 23 minute mark discusses the 1931 name change to Fort Wayne State School. 23:40 starts an 8-minute discussion of the 1907 The Eugenics Law to sterilize individuals to prevent their having children. 59 minute mark discusses converting the farm land into IPFW and converting Blackhawk Farms into a housing development and building new facities on the Parker Place site.Sponsored by AWS Foundation.

    The newspaper article Days of a forgotten school Stories sought about memories of state center by Terri Richardson published March 08, 2020 in The Journal Gazette newspaper  had a section titled New Sign stating:

    The stories received will be used in a documentary by WFWA-TV PBS Fort Wayne.

    In addition, the History Center will have a temporary exhibit this fall that focuses on the center, how the region has understood the people at the school and artifacts from the school.

    Hays is also hoping to change the sign on the column stone that marks where the original school stood along East State Boulevard to make it more politically correct. Currently, the marker uses the words “retarded,” “idiot” and “feeble minded” to describe the residents at the school. She says that unfortunately these were medical terms used at that time. “You can't erase history.”

    The old sign would be given to the History Center to exhibit.

      A September 25, 2022 post on Facebook promoted The Forgotten A History of the State Developmental Institutions in Fort Wayne documentary broadcast September 26, 2022 by PBS39 WFWA Fort Wayne. The webpage states: A History of the State Developmental Institutions in Fort Wayne In 1879 Indiana decided to create an institution for children with mental disabilities. In 1890 a brand-new facility dedicated to this cause was opened. It was located just northeast of the city of Fort Wayne, on what would later become East State Boulevard. Advances in medical and behavioral treatments, as well as overcrowding partly due to an aging population, led to a new modern complex being built by Saint Joe and Stellhorn roads in northeast Fort Wayne. Using interviews, newspaper accounts, and archival photos and videos from these facilities, this 2-hour historical documentary tells the story of these forgotten places and those that inhabited them. A September 26, 2022 then a September 27, 2022 post on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook generated over 140 comments on the first airing of the show.

    In State Developmental Center Documentary Season 2022 Episode 3033 | 27m 32s | Video has closed captioning. Guests: Patti Hays (CEO - AWS Foundation) & Nancy Louraine (Retired CEO - Turnstone). This area’s only in-depth, live, weekly news, analysis and cultural update forum, PrimeTime airs Fridays at 7:30pm. This program is hosted by PBS Fort Wayne’s President/General Manager Bruce Haines. Aired: 09/23/22 on PrimeTime39 on PBS39 WFWA Fort Wayne.

  8. Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center Friends private Facebook group
  9. Photo Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth, Fort Wayne IN: later known as the State School. Side view from a distance. 1898. reproduced from a printed source. at Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library.
  10. Deaths at Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth, Fort Wayne, Indiana (1891-1917) from annual reports at the Indiana Genenealogical Society.
  11. Annual report of the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth Fort Wayne Indiana on Archive.org
    1. Twenty-first Annual Report October 31, 1899
    2. Twenty-seventh Annual Report October 31, 1905
    3. Thirty-third Annual Report September 30, 1911
    4. Forty-first Annual Report September 30, 1919
    5. Forty-second Annual Report September 30, 1920
    6. Forty-fourth Annual Report September 30, 1922
    7. Forty-fifth Annual Report September 30, 1923
  12. "Annual report of the Fort Wayne State School, Fort Wayne, Indiana." search results Annual report of the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth, Ft. Wayne, Indiana, for the fiscal year ending October 31 ..1909-1915 and 1906/07 at Hathi Trust Digital Library with Google digitized copies: 1909-1915 (original from The Ohio State University) or 1919-1924 (original from The Ohio State University)
  13. Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth search results and Fort Wayne State School search results at Google eBookshows lots of annual reports only a few are listed here
    1. Annual Report of the Fort Wayne State School Issue 4, 1882
    2. Annual Report of the Fort Wayne State School Issue 9, 1887
    3. Annual Report of the Fort Wayne State School, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1908
    4. Annual Report of the Fort Wayne State School, Fort Wayne, Indiana 1935
    5. Annual Report of the Fort Wayne State School, 1948
    6. Annual Report of the Fort Wayne State School, Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1950
    7. Annual Report by Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center · 1966
  14. Family And Social Services Administration. Disability And Rehabilitative Services, Division of Fort Wayne State Developmental Center at Research Indiana.
  15. Old Fort News Volume 83 - Number 2 -2020 The Fort Wayne State Developmental Center The Pace of Educational Change at The History Center. See cover photo at Google.com
  16. Old State School Cemetery Located On IPFW Grounds Feeble-Minded at IPFW An Historic Look at the Grounds was published January 11, 2012 in Vol. 42 Issue 15 of the IPFW student newspaper The Communicator on Purdue University Fort Wayne Helmke Library.mDON: mastodon Digital Object Network .
  17. Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center, 1879-1979 book by Bette Peterson and Employee handbook, Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center at Indiana State Library from WorldCat.org.
  18. Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center 1975 and Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center 1979 at Google eBook.
  19. Fort Wayne State Hospital and Training Center, 1879-1979 images Google search results without dates
  20. The history of the Fort Wayne State School for the Feebleminded : Fort Wayne Indiana, 1889-1942 by Evelyn G. Bell, M.A. University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration 1947 on WorldCat.org.
  21. Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth ca. 1900 with photo by Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and authorpublished May 4, 2017 at Fort Wayne Reader.
  22. Fort Wayne, IN: Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth (State School) with several photos published July 29, 2020 on Towns and Nature blog.
  23. 2011 and vintage photos on February 23, 2014discussion and album on Vintage Fort Wayne on Facebook
  24. May 29, 2017 post on the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.
  25. 1915 legislation to pay $300 to injured brickyard laborer Keith Dickson at a May 22, 1912 incident at the school was the subject in a January 21, 2014 Tuesday Tidbit on Indiana Genealogical Society on Facebook.
  26. Fort Wayne Developmental Center at Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia
  27. A Real Classic, Right Here in 'Your Country' by Eric Olson 21Country at 21AliveNews.com Indiana NewsCenter March 25, 2013.
  28. An August 2, 1919 photograph of Scenes on State School Farm Friday When Thousands of Farmers Gathered for Tractor Demonstration on the front page of The News-Sentinel newspapersparked an August 2, 2014 discussion on the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.
  29. A color postcard was posted April 19, 2019 by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook.
  30. “We Cannot Make a Silk PurseOut of a Sow’s Ear”Eugenics in the Hoosier Heartland by Alexandra Minna Stern published in the Indiana Magazine of History 103 (March 2007) online at Scholar Works Indiana University.
  31. Fort Wayne is mentioned 36 times in the 92 page THE EUGENIC ORIGINS OF INDIANA’S MUSCATATUCK COLONY: 1920-2005 Abigail Nicole Bragg Submitted to the faculty of the University Graduate School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Arts in the Department of History Indiana University September 2020 online at Scholar Works Indiana University.
  32. Annual report of the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth, Ft. Wayne, Indiana, for the fiscal year ending .. by Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth Publication date 1905. There are several more reports online.
  33. At Richmond, between 1887 and 1890, three of the completed buildings were occupied by "The School for Feeble Minded Youth." In 1890, these patients were transferred to what is now known as the "Fort Wayne Developmental Center." The buildings were refurbished and the hospital formally opened on July 29, 1890, with the first patient admitted on August 4, 1890. copied from Family and Social Services Administration on IN.gov.
  34. Cornerstone photos of 1898 cornerstone, several photos, and historical information at 200 @ 200 2016 Bicentennial items at The History Center.
  35. Google Search shows lots of photos from various sources.
  36. Indiana School for Feeble Minded Youth ca. 1900 by Randy Harter Fort Wayne Reader 2017-05-04.
  37. Read the history Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth -- Fort Wayne State School Mortality Lists then search the Index on the The Genealogy Center with names and causes of death.
  38. Fort Wayne State School photo with brief information at the Indiana Disability History Project.
  39. The Asylum Projects.org Wiki has a history and several photos.
  40. A postcard of the school and September 14, 2013 discussion on the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.
  41. Jerry Henry, son of social worker Jerome Henry, who lived in an old farm house on the school property in the 1950s-60s recalls growing up near the school and the cemetery that existed at that time. Research shows more than 200 graves existed, possibly more. The History Center was hoping to team with PFW archaeology students in the summer of 2020 before the COVID-19 Pandemic started to identify the boundaries of the cemetery. The AWS Foundation and the History Center as part of a project to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act are researching and documenting the history of the school and center to show how far society has progressed when it comes to people with disabilities. They are hoping to collect stories to used in a documentary by WFWA-TV PBS Fort Wayne. In addition, the History Center will have a temporary exhibit the fall of 2020 that focuses on the center, how the region has understood the people at the school and artifacts from the school. Read more in Days of a forgotten school Stories sought about memories of state center by Terri Richardson published March 08, 2020 in The Journal Gazette newspaper .
  42. Photos posted and discussed February 24, 2023 by Ancient America on Facebook.
  43. Photos posted and discussed May 18, 2023 showing The State School plaque and the column one of the few things remaining from the buildings and another batch May 18, 2023 on Abandoned and Forgotten Indiana Facebook group.
  44. July 29, 2023 post by Indiana Historical Bureau on Facebook:

    After reports of neglect and abuse at several Indiana institutions for people living with disabilities, the deinstitutionalization movement led to the closure of many of these facilities. To ease this transition from institutions back into society, Governor Frank O’Bannon established the 317 Task Force in 1998. He instructed the task force to study how the state could provide comprehensive support to people with disabilities. The group met monthly to discuss the needs of people with disabilities, their lived experiences, and how best to serve them. Notably, Chairwoman Kathy Davis made a point to include both people with disabilities and their families on the task force. The task force’s final recommendation was dubbed the “317 Plan” and recommended person-centered support plans that focused on community integration.

    This task force united advocates in the disability community and other allies for the cause. On Wednesday, December 9, 1998, hundreds of people living with disabilities, their families, and other advocates rallied at the statehouse to show their support for the 317 Plan and request full funding for it. Their advocacy was successful, and, in 1999, the governor and Indiana General Assembly allocated nearly $40 million dollars to implement the first phase of the 317 Plan, which implemented home and community-based services.

    To learn more about the 317 Plan and the history of Hoosiers with disabilities, visit the Indiana Disability History Project: https://www.indianadisabilityhistory.org/items/show/179

    Image courtesy of the Indianapolis News, December 10, 1998.

    Video from link above:

    The 317 Plan: Charting a New Path August 3, 2017 by Indiana Disability History on YouTube

    The 317 Plan marked a significant step in Indiana's history of providing services to people with disabilities. John Dickerson, David Mank, Randy Krieble, and Bettye Dunham talk about the impact the 317 Plan had on developing community based services.
    Video produced by Center on Aging and Community/Indiana Institute on Disability and Community/Indiana University. Funded in part by a grant from the Indiana Governor's Council for People with Disabilities
    Copyright 2017 The Trustees of Indiana University
    Music Attribution: Redwood Trail by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...)
    Artist: http://audionautix.com/

  45. August 7, 2023 post by The Atlantic on Facebook:

    For decades, America hid away disabled children. Jennifer Senior’s aunt Adele was one of them. For our September issue, she tells the story of Adele’s life, and considers the life she might have lived. The Ones We Sent Away I thought my mother was an only child. I was wrong.

  46. August 7, 2023 post by The Public Domain Review on Facebook:

    “My liberty, and my very existence as an individual being, had been signed away behind my back. In my weakened perceptions I at first thought that the mansion was an hotel. Left alone in a big room on the first evening, I was puzzled by the entrance of a wild-looking man, who described figures in the air with his hand, to an accompaniment of gibber, ate a pudding with his fingers at the other end of a long table, and retired. My nerve was shaken to its weakest, remember; and I was alone with him! It was not an hotel. It was a lunatic asylum.”

    My Experiences in a Lunatic Asylum by Herman Charles Merivale on Archive.org.

  47. Not Fort Wayne but this post shows a lunacy declaration for a now treatable medical condition epilepsy in the 1800s.

    September 9, 2023 post by the Greene County Archives on Facebook:

    On Tuesday, we highlighted an affidavit claiming an individual was deemed a threat to the community due to her epilepsy. This was common practice in the 1800s, and it continued through the 1900s. This week, we are sharing a blog from 2020 exploring the treatment of the disease through history.

    Epilepsy and Lunacy: Medical Diagnoses of the 1800s

    Image: Inquest of Epilepsy of Mahlon Ogle, 1930 (Greene County Probate Court Records)

    ***********************

    Modern Parkview Health epilepsy post:

    September 12, 2023 post by Parkview Health on Facebook:

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes recurring, unprovoked seizures. Since the condition affects 3.4 million people in the U.S., it's important for everyone to know the signs and how to assist someone who is in distress.

    Diagnosing, treating and managing epilepsy 

Indiana Theater

Discussed May 12, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

International Harvester

Now called Navistar, construction began in 1922 at the intersection of East Pontiac and Bueter Road. Production began in 1923 and a milestone was reached at the plant forty years later in 1963 when the one-millionth truck, a semi-tractor, rolled off the assembly line. September 28, 1982 on the front page of The Journal Gazette newspaper. Harvester announced it would shut the Fort Wayne plant laying off 2,100 workers. Early in 1979, 10,600 people worked for Harvester. The engineering and parts distribution center would remain with about 2,000 employed in 1984. The city assembled a $31 million aid package for the 60-year-old local plant compared to the $27.6 million package offered for the 17-year-old successful Springfield, Ohio facility.The last truck rolled off Fort Wayne assembly line July 15, 1983. See photos on Throwback Thursday: July 15, 1983 – Last truck rolls off line at Harvester plant published June 29, 2017 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.

Lifted Life TV posted a video to playlist Real Throwback, June 21, 2018, Golden, CO., on Facebook.

  1. Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Libraryhas the Fort Wayne Operations News , International Harvester Employee Publications, and International Harvester Company-Navistar Photographs Collection with images.

    April 14, 2023 post by the Genealogy Center on Facebook:

    The International Harvester collection in our Community Album is an ongoing project. As it grows, it will span the entire history of IH/Navistar in Fort Wayne from the early 1920s to the 2010s. The images come from retirees, former employees, and families who wish to preserve the memory of the workers and the company that made Fort Wayne the home of the Scout and “the Heavy-Duty Truck Capital of the World.”

    Browse the collection here: http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/digital/collection/IHCNC

  2. IH News (1963.09.27) photo copy of the IH News showing the One Millionth Truck Produced by Fort Wayne Works in the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library.
  3. German web site has information on military trucks.
  4. There is an International Harvester Ambulances page on Facebook but does not have this photo.

    Massed Detroit-made Army ambulances parked at the Ordnance Depot, Fort Wayne, Indiana, ready to be shipped to Europe for D-Day, March 1944 [600 × 385]
    byu/WowDidYouSeeThis in HistoryPorn

  5. May 3, 2017 post by the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook:

    A trolley picks up passengers at the Bueter Road stop, just outside of International Harvester, in 1945

  6. December 1, 2023 post by Scout 80/800's is with Scout Motors on Facebook:

    Today. 63 years ago. This happened.

    The first Scout rolled out of Door #11 of IH's Assembly Plant in Fort Wayne on 12/1/1960.

    ....

    #ihscout #internationalharvester #originalsuv #ogsuv #scout80 #internationalscout #Scout800 #fortwayne #fwhistory

  7. July 11, 2017 post on Fort Wayne Food Tours on Facebook:

    Considered by many to be the first SUV, between 1960 and 1980, over 500,000 International Harvester Scouts were made here in #FortWayne.

  8. Tiny houses near the factory for WWII veterans Tin Village is on our World War II Military page. Similar small houses were built in the 1930s by the Fort Wayne Housing Authority.
  9. December 28, 2017 post by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook:

    For "Throwback Thursday" we share this EDITORIAL from the Fort Wayne Journal - Gazette from July 6, 2003. Everybody has some memory of Harvester. BTW ...Hofer and Davis, Inc. has provided many surveys for International Harvester, from some topographical surveys in the 1960's to HARVESTER PARK, the new mixed use rebirth in 2006.

  10. Driven by love for Scouts Vehicle search reveals loyalty to city product by Ryan Duvall published December 16, 2018 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.
  11. Harvester Homecoming on Facebook, now an annual event setting up a museum at the former factory site. The original event was discussed on PrimeTime39 - June 7, 2019 Season 2019 Episode 20 Harvester Homecoming. Guests - Creager Smith and Jerry Betley.
  12. August 7, 2019 by The History Center on Facebook:

    The backbones of many Midwestern cities are the heavy industries that have been attracted to these communities. By the mid-twentieth century, Fort Wayne became known as the “Heavy-Duty Truck Capital of the World.” International Harvester established a large plant east of Fort Wayne in 1923 where 1,527,299 heavy- and medium-sized trucks were built. In addition to trucks, an early sport utility vehicle called the “Scout” was produced in an adjacent plant from November 1960 to October 1980. It was a popular, innovative vehicle and 532,674 were manufactured in its 20 year run. At its peak, “The Harvester” was the largest employer in the area, contributing to the growth of the local economy and providing jobs for 10,000 workers. A manufacturing tradition came to an end on July 15, 1983, when the last truck rolled off the assembly line at the Fort Wayne plant. #sociallyhistory

  13. McCardell Resigns as Chairman of Harvester by James L. Rowe Jr. published May 4, 1982 now on Washington Post.com.
  14. November 26, 2019 post by International Harvester Collectors Chapter 37 Eastern North Carolina on Facebook:

    A sad day for International Harvester

    November 26, 1984 was a dark day in the equipment world, it was the day that the once mighty International Harvester Company died.

    As a result of poor management decisions, combined with a crippling labor strike in 1980, in the midst of the worst economic and agricultural depression since the 1930's, IH Ag Equipment group could not return to profitability in time to save their "ship" from sinking. They had endured continuous losses in fiscal years 1980-1984.

    The IH truck and engine group was able to return to profitability in 1984 but it was not enough to overcome the Ag Equipment division's losses, therefore forcing the company to close plants and liquidate the viable assets to Tenneco, who also owned J.I. Case Company at the time; the results of this purchase being what we now know as Case IH.

    IH survived in the truck & engine business and renamed itself Navistar as the "International Harvester" name no longer reflected the nature of their business and the IH name went to the Case IH group in the sale of the Ag Group. Navistar still exists today with their trucks and engines being known as simply "International".

  15. From the Farm Equipment History Files ... Why Did International Harvester Break Up? by Paul Wallem, former IH executive and dealer-principal posted on August 28, 2019 in Manufacturer & Dealer Issues on Farm-equipment.com.
  16. Volkswagen truck unit Traton finalises $3.7 billion Navistar acquisition deal by Reuters Staff published November 7, 2020 on reuters.com.
  17. Volkswagen May Bring Back the International Harvester Scout The legendary SUV may return as an all-electric off-roader to take on Wrangler and Bronco. by Scott Evans posted Sep 20, 2021 on MotorTrend.com.
  18. November 15, 2021 Facebook post and discussion on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook was an article called Archie McCardell, former International Harvester CEO is the worst CEO in history by Yves Smith originally posted in Naked Capitalism on October 8, 2019.
  19. August 11, 2022 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    Exciting times, indeed! The Drive

    Scott Keogh CEO at Scout Motors visits Fort Wayne

  20. August 24, 2022 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    So glad we have been welcomed to be a part of the new Scout coming to life! post

    Scott Keogh CEO at Scout Motors LinkedIn review of his August 6, 2022 visit to Fort Wayne.

  21. May 21, 2022 some interesting history and commentary about the Scout, International Harvester, and Volkswagen by Autoline.TV.

    VW’s Golden Opportunity with The Scout Brand posted May 21, 2022 by Autoline Network on YouTube

    Autoline provides daily global automotive news. Top auto executive interviews. Automotive insight & analysis. EV, AV & ICE technology, car sales & financial earnings, new car reviews. Volkswagen used to be the number one import brand in the American market but then it lost it all. Today, it sells fewer cars in the U.S. than it did in 1970. But with its acquisition of the Scout brand from International Harvester, VW can claw its way back. In fact, Scout could become the equivalent of the Jeep brand for Volkswagen.

  22. Around 40 aerial photos were posted May 23, 2020 of International Harvester Park by Above the Land on Facebook.
  23. February 6, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook shared Emily Dwire WANE 15 post February 6, 2023:

    POSITIVELY FORT WAYNE: International truck enthusiasts of all ages and from all over spent a recent weekend in Fort Wayne tuning up dozens of vehicles in Harvester Homecoming's collection including a 1907 Auto Buggy. Check it out!

    International enthusiasts restore dozens of Harvester Homecoming trucks during annual wrenching weekend by Emily Dwire, February 6, 2023 on CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15.

  24. February 14, 2023 post by 3Rivers Federal Credit Union on Facebook:

    It's our 88th birthday! On February 14, 1935, 3Rivers opened our doors as International Harvester Company Fort Wayne Works Employees Federal Credit Union. While our name has gotten shorter, we’ve grown in every other way!

    We’ve expanded our footprint, currently operating 22 branches throughout northeast, central, and east central Indiana, and St. Marys, Ohio. We’ve gone from $250 in assets to $2.2B and three employees to nearly 500.

    Most importantly, though, is the longstanding trust our now 110,000 members have put in us to help them reach their financial goals over the decades. Helping our members and celebrating their achievements is what inspires us to continue growing.

    Getting the keys to their first cars and first homes, traveling the world, earning degrees, starting families, opening businesses, living debt free, retiring early… each of our members has their own, unique dreams, and we’re here to support all of them!

    Thank you to our members, our employees, and our community for allowing us to be a part of your stories. We appreciate you!

    [Check out our transformation: Our headquarters at the International Harvester campus in 1935 and our corporate office at Northland Blvd. today!]

  25. February 19, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    We are proud to help with this endeavor and hope everyone will contribute to PBS Fort Wayne to make it happen. Funding has been secured to keep the ball rolling!

    Fill out the donor application placed in the comments section here to be a part of this: https://vimeo.com/586431955

    PBS Fort Wayne, the northeast Indiana, northwest Ohio PBS station plans to create a historical documentary bringing to life the history of International Harvester in our community. The documentary, with Ryan DuVall serving as executive producer, will be thoroughly researched not just using archival information from newspaper, broadcast news reports, International Harvester resources, and anecdotal information, it will be told by those who worked there.

    The documentary will be produced by the award-winning production team at PBS Fort Wayne.

    The story of International Harvester in Fort Wayne starts with construction on the production facility in 1922 with the first trucks rolling off the assembly line in 1923. The Fort Wayne plant (known as The Fort Wayne Truck Works) was a big producer of trucks and wartime vehicles during WWII employing more than 10,500 people at its peak.

    Harvester ceased production of the Scout in 1980 and in July 1983 all truck manufacturing operations were moved to Springfield, OH with the last truck rolling off the Fort Wayne Works assembly line.

    PBS Fort Wayne, Northeast Indiana’s unofficial historian will tell the story of trial and triumph, of invention and innovation in this planned documentary.

    This story will be revealed through conversations with former employees along with owners and collectors of International Harvester Scouts and Heavy-Duty Trucks. Some stories have already been recorded. With your help we will be able to bring this story of how multiple generations of families worked and played alongside their Harvester family leaving an indelible mark on Fort Wayne.

    PBS Fort Wayne welcomes your contributions to help bring this story to life. Your donation (no matter the size) will help fund this large undertaking and cement your commitment of quality television programming to the community of PBS viewers. Contributors to this special project will be recognized at the beginning and end of the documentary. Major corporate donations are being sought as well. The program will air multiple times on PBS Fort Wayne and its sub-channel PBS Explore and will be offered for broadcast at other PBS stations upon completion. Copies of the program will also be available for purchase following its premier.


    HARVESTER DOCUMENTARY TRAILER.mp4 from PBS Fort Wayne on Vimeo.

  26. International Harvestor Refrigerator

    February 28, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    But do these recipes work in other refrigerators or only under the magic cooling power of a Harvester? Also, Shrimp Tomato Mold for the win. Big thanks to Steve Tiny Michaels for the donation! 

  27. March 3, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    😪 the dream is gone for #fortwayneindiana. But we are still excited about the future if this company and its vision. Hopefully we can help and play a role in some way going forward.

  28. May 1, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    We got that 1932 rolling ... and dumping! Thanks to Arthur Gillis Cookies Man and Fred Douglas Newhouse for their great efforts!

  29. August 7, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    Another little peek at our documentary with PBS Fort Wayne

    Heavy Duty Truck Capital of the World, International Harvester Documentary Trailer from PBS Fort Wayne on Vimeo.

  30. August 18, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    Lucky to meet the lovely Linda Stevenson today! That is her on the cover in 1960 and her today!

  31. August 23, 2023 post by Genealogy Center on Facebook:

    It's #waybackwednesday! Take a look at this photo from the Harter Postcard Collection in our Community Album. This image depicts the Fort Wayne International Harvester plant as it appeared circa 1930.

    For more historic photos, check out our Community Album: http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/

  32. August 22, 2023 post by Indiana Landmarks on Facebook:

    [The former International Harvester Engineering Building is shown first on the latest list of Hoosier landmarks in jeopardy.]

    ⚠️ Today, Indiana Landmarks announces its #10MostEndangered, an annual list of Hoosier landmarks in jeopardy.

    The list includes an architect-designed industrial building; a threatened Victorian neighborhood; historic fraternal lodges; a significant Queen Anne home; a former movie palace; an Art Deco skyscraper; a commercial block that embodies Indiana’s limestone legacy; a manufacturing mogul’s neglected mansion; a long vacant county home; and a church designed by a trailblazing Black architect.

    Places that land on the 10 Most Endangered list often face a combination of problems rather than a single threat—abandonment, neglect, dilapidation, obsolete use, development pressure, or owners who simply lack money for repairs.

    “Indiana Landmarks uses its 10 Most Endangered list in several ways. Sometimes it serves an educational role. It functions as an advocacy tool. And it can assist in raising funds needed to save a place,” says Marsh Davis, president of the nonprofit preservation organization. “Each endangered place tells a distinct story, and each faces its own set of challenges. In all cases, when an endangered place lands on our list, we commit to seeking solutions that lead to rescue and revitalization,” he adds.

    ➡️ Visit 10 Most Endangered Going...Going...Not Quite Gone the places we could lose unless we act to see the full list of endangered properties and watch our account in the coming days to learn more about each site. 📸: Thomas and Louisa Little House in Plainfield by Evan Hale

    #indianalandmarks #10MostEndangered #savingmeaningfulplaces #deserve2preserve

  33. August 24, 2023 post by Indiana Landmarks on Facebook:

    ⚠️ 10 Days of #10MostEndangered - sites in imminent jeopardy on Indiana Landmarks' 10 Most Endangered List in 2023. Day 2: International Harvester Engineering Building in #FortWayne

    In Fort Wayne, few companies loom as large in local memory as International Harvester. From 1923 until 1983, the company manufactured more than 1.5 million heavy-duty trucks and over 500 thousand Scouts (an early sports utility vehicle) from a complex on the city’s east side. Its prolific output earned its Truck Plant 1 the nickname "The Heavy-Duty Truck Capitol of thIn Fort Wayne, few companies loom as large in local memory as International Harvester. From 1923 until 1983, the company manufactured more than 1.5 million heavy-duty trucks and over 500 thousand Scouts (an early sports utility vehicle) from a complex on the city’s east side. Its prolific output earned its Truck Plant 1 the nickname "The Heavy-Duty Truck Capitol of the World."

    The architectural firm of Albert Kahn & Associates designed the 1950-1952 Engineering Building on Meyer Road, taking inspiration from the shape of the International Harvester logo. For decades, every truck International Harvester put on the road was designed, developed, and tested at the building and nearby track. From 1986 to 2012, Navistar International owned the building, continuing its use as an engineering facility. It was later acquired by a local developer.

    In 2019, enthusiasts launched Harvester Homecoming at the site, a festival that draws hundreds of vehicles and thousands of attendees, and, in cooperation with the site’s owner, began using the Engineering Building to house 65 International Harvester and Navistar trucks and artifacts. It’s an arrangement Harvester Homecoming hopes to formalize by turning the building into a permanent museum, but earlier this year Allen County Commissioners acquired a parcel along Meyer Road that includes the Engineering Building with intent to build a new jail on the undeveloped land and consider the building for county offices. Harvester Homecoming is concerned for the landmark’s future, as another developer has already demolished the nearby former test track.

    As an important link to Fort Wayne’s automotive heritage, the Engineering Building merits protection and a reuse that celebrates and shares its story.

    Visit https://www.indianalandmarks.org/10-most-endangered/ to see all the 10 Most Endangered. 📸: Evan Hale⁠

    #indianalandmarks #10MostEndangered #savingmeaningfulplaces #deserve2preserve #internationalharvester #harvesterhomecoming

  34. August 23, 2023 post by The Journal Gazette on Facebook:

    The former International Harvester engineering building is on the latest list of Hoosier landmarks in jeopardy.

    Former Harvester engineering building on endangered landmark list 

  35. August 28, 2023 post by Harvester Homecoming on Facebook:

    More great pics! Thanks to Chris Mercer for lending his talents!

    [notice the brick floors in some of the photos: 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, - see brick streets]

  36. September 27, 2023 post by IH Parts America Inc on Facebook:

    Looking back at @harvesterhomecoming and seeing how cool it was to see the first Scout made sitting next to the last Scout to roll off the Fort Wayne assembly line.

    #ihpartsamerica#harvesterhomecoming#ihscout#firstscout#lastscout

Back to top

Internet Archive

Includes the Wayback Machine that archives web sites no longer online. The company has been archiving Public Domain pre-1923 books from the Allen County Public Libraryand The Genealogy Center for many years then placed online at archive.org. Many of our links go to archived web pages on the Wayback Machines and local history books archived on Internet Archiveare found embeded in some of our pages.

Internet Archive from Deepspeed media on Vimeo.

Interurban Railways

See Interurban Railways on our Railroad page and Transfer Corner.

IPFW - Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne

After many years of offering courses at separate locations in Fort Wayne, Indiana University and Purdue University opened the combined campus of Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne in 1964.

July 6, 2016 post by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook:

For "Throwback Thursday" we dig out the ol' scrapbook and share this article for the groundbreaking at IPFW from the October 19, 1962 edition of the Fort Wayne Journal - Gazette. By the way.... Hofer and Davis provided the survey for the Foundation when they purchased the property.

November 23, 2016 post by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook:

Hey Hey Hey!!! It's Wall of Fame Wednesday Baby! This is the artist's sketch of Kettler Hall from the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL -GAZETTE on January 1, 1963. BTW... Hofer and Davis did the boundary surveying for the Foundation when they purchased the property at State Road 37 and Coliseum.... and the Fort Wayne (IPFW) Mastodons had their biggest basketball victory last night beating Indiana University (Ranked #3 in the country) in overtime at The War Memorial Coliseum! Congrats to the "Dons"!

January 14, 2016 post by Purdue University Fort Wayne on Facebook:

This aerial view of the IPFW campus in 1970 shows the Education Building, later renamed Kettler Hall. Can you spot Allen County War Memorial Coliseum? #IPFWtbt #ThrowbackThursday

  1. For more than a century, Indiana University has provided higher education opportunities for northeast Indiana in Fort Wayne (1917 to 1964)
  2. Purdue University Fort Wayne History THIS IS OUR STORY
  3. Indiana and Purdue Universities were officially split into two compuses July 1, 2018 into Indiana University Fort Wayne and Purdue Fort Wayne.
  4. Process of changing IPFW to Purdue Fort Wayne ramping up gradually by Kevin Kilbane published March 29, 2018 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  5. Indiana University Fort Wayne, Purdue University Fort Wayne, and Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
  6. See our Purdue University Fort Wayne section.

Irene Byron Hospital - Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanitorium

Formerly at 12101 Lima Road, Street View photo from Google map shows current view. A new facility Byron Health Center broke ground in 2018 at Lake Avenue and Beacon Street. See the Tuberculosis section of our Diseases of Allen County page.

At the end of the 19th century, one in seven people around the world had died of tuberculosis, and the disease ranked as the third leading cause of death in the United States. While physicians had begun to accept German physician Robert Koch’s scientific confirmation that TB was caused by bacteria, this understanding was slow to catch on among the general public, and most people gave little attention to the behaviors that contributed to disease transmission. They didn’t understand that things they did could make them sick. Copied from the beginning of the article: How Epidemics of the Past Changed the Way Americans Lived Past public health crises inspired innovations in infrastructure, education, fundraising and civic debate by Katherine A. Foss, Zócalo Public Square posted April 1, 2020 on SmithsonianMagazine.com shared October 20, 2022 on Smithsonian Magazine on Facebook.

  1. Irene Byron books at the Allen County Public Library
    1. Irene Byron Hospital, 362 F77
    2. Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanatorium, Fort Wayne, Allen County, Indiana, 977.202 F77IBB, 1926
    3. Minutes of board of managers' meetings of Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanatorium : from January 1, 1927 to Dec 15, 1931, 977.202 F77IBC
    4. Record Book, 977.202 F77IBA, 1996
    5. Report, 1923, 977.202 F77ib
    6. Transactions of the board of managers of the Allen County Tuberculosis Hospital, later the Irene Byron Tuberculosis Hospital1915-1919, 1919-1926, 2 volumes, 977.202 F77ibe, 977.202 F77IBEA
  2. 1938 photos of the Main Building, Sunny-side, and the West Hall Girl's Building from the Joan Hostetler Collection at The Indiana Album.
  3. Sixteen photos from Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanitarium search are similar to Indiana Album photos above at the Ball State Digital Media Repository.
  4. Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanatorium (Fort Wayne, Ind.) book titles but no previews as Google eBook
  5. Named for Irene Byron, the land was a well known home to a large county-owned facility for tuberculosis patients between 1919 and 1976. One proposed move was to Wells Street. Byron Health Center move to old YWCA campus could boost sale of county land by Kevin Leininger published February 8, 2017 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  6. The original grounds on Lima Road had at least one graveyard. In 2020, the county hired American Locating Services of Indianapolis, to use ground-penetrating radar to look for caskets or bodies according to the newspaper article County to look for possible graves Commissioners hire surveyor to study Byron property by Rosa Salter Rodriguez published February 22, 2020 in The Journal Gazette newspaper. It also stated: The need for the study came a few months ago when a longtime area resident told county officials he remembered seeing a second graveyard on the site when he was a teenager in the 1960s to 1970s.
  7. Collection # M 0384, OMB 0003 AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION OF INDIANA RECORDS, 1904–1980 shows Box 17, Folders 1-7, and OMB 0003, Folder 1 are for the Fort Wayne Irene Byron TB Sanitorium or Allen Co. TB Assoc. at the Indiana Historical Society.
  8. Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanatorium-Physician Residences, also known as the Kidder and Draper-Sherwood Houses, were two historic homes located in Perry Township, Allen County, Indiana. They were designed by architect Charles R. Weatherhogg and built in 1934-1935 as housing for the medical director and head staff physician. Weatherhogg had earlier designed the sanatarium complex. The Kidder house was a two-story, Tudor Revival style frame dwelling with brick and stone cladding. The Draper-Sherwood House was a two-story, Colonial Revival style frame dwelling with one-story side wings. Surrounding the houses was a contributing formal landscape design. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004and delisted in 2013. Copied from Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanatorium at Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.
  9. See Inside Abandoned Indiana Hospital Before Its Demolished by Melissa Awesome, Published: April 13, 2022, has videos and photos.
  10. Commissioners: Former Irene Byron site on Lima Road set to be sold after demolition by Jamie Duffy, posted: Jul 15, 2022 on CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15.
    Irene Byron Health Center (1.2022)

    Irene Byron Health Center (1.2022) image taken January 1, 2022 from the Fort Wayne: Irene Byron Health Center series of photos by Daniel Baker on flickr.
  11. Foreign and Forelorn A walk with the Wayward Wanderlust blog posts below:
    1. Byron Health Center and Allen County Infimary / Poor Farm demolition, December 22, 2022
    2. In Memoriam: Irene Byron Tuberculosis Sanatorium and Hospital lists the patients who died at these hospitals. This information has been gleaned by searching the death records for the State of Indiana, often one at a time, to find patients whose death certificates give their location of death as the Sanatorium or Hospital, December 22, 2022
    3. 12371 and 12407 Lima Road, Fort Wayne, Indiana: The Irene Byron Sanatorium and TB Hospital, December 22, 2022
    4. “To a land where the sky is blue”: Patricia Irene Byron’s Story December 22, 2022
    5. Byron Health Center and the Old Allen County Infirmary, 12101 Lima Road, Fort Wayne, Indiana July 25, 2022
  12. Over 70 interior photos posted February 4, 2023 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook.
  13. Another 80 photos taken in 2021 were posted February 4, 2023 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook.

7-minute video Byron Health Center last days presented by Andy Goodwin exclusive last pictures by Honor Rolls March 1, 2023 on YouTube.

24-minute video Abandoned building explore & demolition of County old TB Hospital by Honor Rolls December 18, 2022 on YouTube.
The Byron Healthcare Facility was established in this location in 1916 in Fort Wayne Indiana Allen County. It was an anti Tuberculosis unit. Evolved into a show case facility in the 1930s but fell on hard times until 1954 when the Allen County Home as it was called. In 1974 Allen County Health Center merged with Byron Health Care Center

Founded in 1892, closed August 31, 2014. Constructed some of the city’s most prominent buildings including the Embassy Theatre; the Fort Wayne Water Treatment Plant; the former Waterfield/Wolf & Dessauer/Lincoln Financial building now known as Citizens Square; North Side, Bishop Luers and Paul Harding high schools; projects at Trine University and the University of Saint Francis; the Mizpah Shrine; the (former) GTE building; and many buildings and expansions at and around St. Joseph, Lutheran and Parkview hospitals. From Irmscher built to last Contractor on Embassy, many major projects, closes by Linda Lipp published September 12, 2014 in Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly.

Irishtown

Irishtown Plaza on Fairfield Avenue at Taylor Street, Steet View photo from Google Maps

Website: https://fortwaynehistory.com; Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/irishtownfw. See Irish on People page.

May 28, 2020 post by Irishtown Neighborhood on Facebook:

Doing a little dreaming today. Imagine.

May21, 2020 post by Robert O'Donoghue on Facebook:

Update 5-22-20: Special thanks to Randy Harter over on the You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember. . Group for providing a link to the Sanborn maps. I was off on my numbering quite a bit. The 1890 Sanborn map of Fort Wayne will be exactly what I need for this part of the project!

As part of my research for the book, I am reconstructing the Irishtown neighborhood, using old Fort Wayne City Directories ( the predecessor of what would become the phone book in the 20th century). An interesting problem cropped up in my map project. The addresses are listed in the city directories, however the street numbering format has changed over the years. What was once Welch's Hardware Store at 190 Calhoun Street, is now Welch's Ale House (formerly CS3) at 1915 S Calhoun Street. Same building, different address number. So is it just a matter of multiplying the old address by a factor of ten? Kind of, but not exactly. One of the city directories explains how the streets are numbered. Calhoun Street begins at the St Mary's River and extends to the city limits. So what I need is a second vector to give me a baseline. In another directory, the Fort Wayne Sentinel building was omitted from the directory. The folks who created the directory were kind enough to include the Sentinel on an omissions page. It is listed as being on the east side of Calhoun Street between Wayne and Washington. A subsequent city directory lists the address as 107 Calhoun Street. So I was able to use the Sentinel and Welch's to estimate the address numbering system used before it changed in the early 20th century. Now that's just Calhoun Street. I still have dozens of other streets to figure out. Definitely not something I anticipated when I started the project, but fascinating (to me) nonetheless.

September 21, 2022 post by Irishtown Neighborhood on Facebook:

All of the green house icons are Irish residents in 1876. The red icon is a fire station. #irishtown #fortwaynehistory

March 14, 2023 post by Julia Meek on Facebook:

Sláinte! Rob Stone is ALL about Fort Wayne”s historic Irishtown Neighborhood—hear our conversationon on his journey & what he has discovered today during Morning Edition & ATC.

Local Celtologist is digging city’s rich Irishtown legacy 14-minute interview

May 3, 2023 post by Purdue University Fort Wayne on Facebook:

After 27 years as an information technology professional, Rob Stone figured the pandemic was the perfect time to reassess.

Stone loved studying human history, so he started taking anthropology classes at Purdue University Fort Wayne. He’d been writing history-based articles for years as a hobby, using the pen name O’Donoghue because it was his grandmother’s maiden name.

As part of his new academic direction, Stone started researching to write a book on the history of the Irish in Fort Wayne. About a year-and-a-half into that process, he came across a News-Sentinel article at The History Center that included, “The section of the city immediately south of the Pennsy Shops became known as ‘Irish Town.’”

Read the full story at the link below. 

Research of long-forgotten ‘Irishtown’ illuminates new career path for PFW student

September 19, 2023 post by WANE 15 on Facebook:

On Oct. 1, a Fort Wayne organization will host an event that looks to remember Irishtown, a forgotten Fort Wayne neighborhood with history “too rich and too vibrant to lose,” according to the organization.

‘It should be celebrated:’ Tour, festival look to remember Fort Wayne neighborhood with ‘rich and vibrant’ history

ARCH, a historic preservation organization in Fort Wayne, will host the Irishtown Trolley Tour and Festival, which will offer trolley rides and self-guided neighborhood walks that teach guests about the history of Irishtown.

Irishtown used to roughly make up the land south of downtown from Baker Street to Pontiac Street and from Fairfield Avenue to Calhoun Street, said ARCH Executive Director Connie Haas Zuber.

Haas Zuber said many Irish immigrants helped construct the Wabash & Erie Canal, and those immigrants mostly settled down in what became Irishtown.

“It just so happened, though, that the Irish families tended to clump — as immigrant groups do — in this area just immediately south of what was then a tiny Fort Wayne,” Haas Zuber said.

As Irish immigrants continued to settle into Irishtown, Haas Zuber said the Irish community also had a hand in Fort Wayne’s locomotive industry.

Haas Zuber said by the 1880s, there were 1,100 Irish immigrants living in Irishtown in addition to descendants of Irish immigrants who were born in America.

The Becker House, located at 425 W. Williams St., is in the heart of what once was Irishtown and is documented by the National Register of Historic Places. According to the National Register of Historic Places, the Becker House was built in 1886.

“[Fort Wayne] continued being a good place to get a good job and to bring your family, and Irish people kept coming here,” Haas Zuber said.

However, by around the 1920s, Haas Zuber said Irishtown was starting to be rebuilt and the Irish community started dispersing to other parts of Fort Wayne, which caused the memory and Irishtown to fade away over time.

Some of the Irishtown staples Haas Zuber said have been lost to time include Irish-based fraternal organizations, a grocery store and an ice cream factory.

Even the name itself is no longer used, as the area considered to be Irishtown is now divided into two neighborhoods: Hoagland Masterson and Williams-Woodland Park.

Irishtown Plaza, located at Fairfield Avenue and Taylor Street, sits in the heart of what once was Irishtown.

However, she also pointed out that some remnants of Irishtown still remain including St. Patrick’s Catholic Church and some houses that are either documented by the National Register of Historic Places or have been around since the 1860s.

October 24, 2023 post by Irishtown Neighborhood on Facebook:

New accoutrements in Irishtown! This one is at the Plaza, and there are 2 more in the area.

October 27, 2023 post by Irishtown Neighborhood on Facebook:

Corner of Williams and Harrison

February 9, 2024 post by Irishtown Neighborhood on Facebook:

Fairfield Ave just north of Locust St. Installed today.

February 9, 2024 post by Fort Wayne Neighborhoods on Facebook:

The Irishtown area (also known as Hoagland Masterson Neighborhood Association and Poplar Neighborhood Association) in the Packard Area Planning Alliance (PAPA) was settled over 170 years ago, much of it by Irish immigrants who built Fort Wayne's canals and railroads. The Irishtown Neighborhood, home to St. Patrick's, the Irishtown Shamrocks Baseball Team, and many other Irish businesses was well documented until the mid-1920s, when the area lost its historic name and much of its identity was forgotten. Only recent archeological and historic preservation work has uncovered the neighborhood's past.

The Packard 2030 Neighborhood Plan was adopted last year. It included identifying and marketing the Irishtown area as a vibrant multicultural corridor and historic neighborhood located south of downtown along Fairfield Avenue.

We are excited to see these new markers installed today to begin celebrating our vibrant history in Fort Wayne. Special thanks to the City of Fort Wayne Government Office of Housing and Neighborhood Services and Public Works Right of Way for supporting this action step in the plan.

www.packardplan.org

The Irishtown area connecting the Poplar Neighborhood Association and the Hoagland Masterson Neighborhood Association in...

Posted by Poplar Neighborhood Association on Monday, February 12, 2024

February 12, 2024 post by Poplar Neighborhood Association on Facebook:

The Irishtown area connecting the Poplar Neighborhood Association and the Hoagland Masterson Neighborhood Association in the Packard Area Planning Alliance (PAPA) was settled over 170 years ago. Early Irish immigrants built Fort Wayne's canals and railroads. Irishtown was home to St. Patrick's Catholic Church, the Irishtown Shamrocks Baseball Team, and many other Irish businesses.

The Packard 2030 Neighborhood Plan adopted Irishtown with historical markers along the Fairfield Avenue corridor just south of downtown thanks to the City of Fort Wayne Government Office of Housing and Neighborhood Services and Public Works Right of Way. Learn more about the Packard Area Planning Alliance (PAPA) or participate in ongoing planning for your neighborhood.

www.packardplan.org (Picture by Ben Traxmor, Poplar Neighborhood Association)

Irving & Blanche Pinkus House

January 26, 2023 post by ARCH, Inc. on Facebook:

The Irving & Blanche Pinkus House on Kensington Boulevard is the subject of this week’s Throwback Thursday post. This c. 1925 Streamline Moderne house has smooth stucco walls with three bands of trim, corner slider windows and a recessed entry with original door. The Austrian-born Mr. Pinkus was a vice-president of the Fort Wayne Tailoring Company.

Isaly Creamery

A January 13, 2020 post with a photo by Foellinger Foundation on Facebook stated: This photo was taken on January 13, 1955, before the demolition of Isaly's Creamery. Soon after, construction began on the existing Fort Wayne Newspaper building, where Helene R. Foellinger was owner and publisher from 1936 to 1980. Berry Cafe and Deluxe Glass are now Henry's Restaurant. #downtownfortwayne #history

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