A Named Places in Allen County, Indiana

AAA Auction Service

2110 McConnel Drive, New Haven, IN 46774, (260) 493-6585. O.G. “Bud” Steinman founded AAA Auction Service in 1972 and passed away in 2000. AAA Auction Service conducts estate and commercial/industrial auctions and appraisals in the greater Fort Wayne area and throughout the Midwest. Copied from web site History. See Facebook page.

Abbott Magnetic Mineral Well

2502 Edsall Avenue Street View photo from Google maps

The Abbott Magnetic Mineral Well by Daniel Beals on YouTube

Near the corner of what is now Edsall and Raymond Avenues, once sat a popular place of healing: the Abbott Magnetic Mineral Well. Hobbyist historian Mark Linehan spent months compiling obscure information after discovering the topic, during his research on the gas boom in Indiana. “In 1888, William T. Abbott… he owned al this land here,” Linehan said, gesturing to large acreage southeast of downtown Fort Wayne. “All the locales wanted to strike a natural gas well, because that’s essentially free power.” Nine deep bore wells were drilled, though no gas was found. But Abbott wasn’t close to giving up. “He was spending a lot of money and time and had experts come out. At one point, the newspapers started to kind of make fun of him for going so deep, and not finding gas,” he added. “Finally at about 1900 feet down — that’s pretty deep — he found a well of artisan water.” Is the first two lines for the video and of the article 21Country: The Abbott Magnetic Mineral Well Fort Wayne’s healing spa between 1888-1913 by Daniel Beals at 21AliveNews.com.

  1. The complete research of Mark Linehan, including maps, illustrations, photos and and more is titled Abbott Magnetic Mineral Well, Fort Wayne, Indiana (1888-1913) at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
  2. An article on pages 7-8 of Vol. 47 | No. 2 | December 2022 of the Allen County Lines quarterly publication in the Membership section of the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana website references the Sixteenth Annual Report of the Indiana Department of Geology and Natural History, 1888.
    1. The 26-page REPORT UPON THE GEOLOGY OF ALLEN COUNTY. by CHARLES R. DRYER, M. D referenced in the story above is available online at IUScholarWorks.iu.edu.
    2. The item Report Upon the Geology of Allen County Dryer, Charles R. description.
    3. Annual Report 016, 1888 is the article in the Indiana Department of Geology and Natural History, Sixteenth Annual Report Gorby, S.S. (Editor) at IUScholarWorks.iu.edu.
    4. Dryer, C.R. (1888). "Report Upon the Geology of Allen County". In Indiana Department of Geology and Natural History, Sixteenth Annual Report, pp. 105-130 at IUScholarWorks.iu.edu.
    5. Allen County Geology description at Indiana Geological & Water Survey Indiana University.

Abby Brown's Candy

Closed August 8, 2015. Daniel Poore opened the store on East State Boulevard in 1976 after purchasing it from his aunt the real Abby Brown. He took Abby's recipes and shop idea and relocated it from Anderson, IN to Fort Wayne. Daniel died in 2013, then his wife Katie decided to close and auction the store and contents August 15, 2015. See February 14, 2015 Abby Brown's Candy Shoppe Interview on YouTube in its 39th year. Abby Brown's closing next month by Jeff Wiehe publshed March 16, 2016 in The Journal Gazette newspaper and Fort Wayne landmark candy store closing after 39 years by Barb Sieminski published July 18, 2015 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.

A. C. Mannweiler - Anthony Wayne Lamp Company

A November 16, 2022 post by The History Center on Facebook:

Christmas lights have played an important role in Fort Wayne’s history, from the manufacture of lights by A. C. Mannweiler and the Anthony Wayne Lamp Co., to the lit Wolf & Dessauer Santa and the Fantasy of Lights. Lighting is a relatively new addition to holiday décor. The trend of lit Christmas trees did not take hold until the 19th century. In 1856, President Franklin Pierce displayed the first Christmas tree at the White House, which was lit with candles. The first use of electric Christmas lights can be traced to 1882, when an associate of Edison, Edward H. Johnson, created a display on his Christmas tree. In 1895, the White House featured its first electrically lit tree, and by 1900 businesses began using string lights in shop windows. It was not until the 1930s that the average American was able to afford electric Christmas lights. Through the remainder of the 20th century, Christmas lights increased in popularity, and lighting displays appeared on houses, buildings, and in public places, becoming ever more elaborate and festive. Visit the History Center to see our new temporary exhibit “Christmas Lights.” #sociallyhistory

Manufacturers Histories at OldChristmasTreeLights.comhas a comment stating: Dick Cook visited this site recently, and wrote to offer the following details about the A.C. Mannweiler Company: "I grew up in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and the A.C. Mannweiler shop was up on the corner from where we lived. Mr. Mannweiler had passed away before I was born, but I knew his only daughter, and everybody called her Mrs. B. She and her husband took over the business after Mr. Mannweiler died. I remember as a child going to their store with my parents where I would get them to purchase some of the Mannweiler miniature based Christmas lamps. I believe Mrs. B and her husband continued to make at least some of the Mannweiler Christmas lamps into 1940 or 1941. As of August, 2001, the building where the company was still stands." "After Mrs. B died, her only living relative gave me her personal papers which has some data pertaining to the Mannweiler Company, including advertising pamphlets and a photograph of Mrs. B as a child with her mother and father alongside a Christmas tree festooned with Mannweiler lamps. Among the papers was a patent number for a design patent for a Christmas candle lamp." Here is a picture of that 1921 patent.

November 27, 2020 post by theHistoric 07 District - Fort Wayne on Facebook:

As we make left-over turkey sandwiches from our Thanksgiving meal, the Christmas season takes flight around us. Did you know that the Historic 07 District has a special place in history for Christmas lights? The building that houses Trubble Brewing was the home of a large light bulb company known as the A.C. Mannweiler Company. By 1920, this company was responsible for the lights on ten thousand trees across the country. The owner at the time estimated the manufacturer created 150,000 lights for Christmas. The story behind the building and the company is fascinating.

When Mannweiller was 15, he became an employee of the Fort Wayne Jenny Electric Company. Through his experience in lamp development, he was able to create his own business. At the time, it was common for fires to start due to candle use on Christmas trees. Mannweiller, seeing an opportunity, started this company on Broadway with his wife. The two of them performed most of the manufacturing themselves. As the demand grew, so did the company; it employed nearly 100 people, including trained glass blowers. Eventually, his daughter, Pauline, assisted in the management of the company.

According to the History Center, “[i]n the 1920s the name of the company was changed to the Anthony Wayne Light Company and . . . [o]n June 6, 1928 Anthony Mannweiler died from a blood clot at St. Joseph Hospital and was buried in Prairie Grove Cemetery in Waynedale, Indiana. Following the death of her father, Pauline Brandenberry and her husband Gregg, inherited the Anthony Wayne Light Company and continued the production of Christmas lights until 1941, when rationing make it difficult to obtain supplies.”

So when you string up your lights for the holiday season, know that our south end of town was responsible for making the world a bit brighter! Remember, for one week the Historic 07 District is selling long-sleeve t-shirts. Order today and receive it by Christmas. The cost is $25 each. As always, all proceeds go to the Historic O7 District neighborhoods for historic preservation initiatives. For more information go to https://historic07district.org/shirt/ (Picture #5 is the Shirt!)

The History Center

Trubble Brewing

Broad River Neighborhood Association - Fort Wayne

Creighton-Home Neighborhood Association

Picture #1 - Electric Candle Lights (1940)

Picture #2 - Glass Blower From the Company (1919)

Picture #3 - Placing Flaments From the Company (1919)

Picture #4 - Current Picture of Trubble Brewing

Picture #5 – Historic 07 District Shifts

ACME by Full Circle

1105 E State Street. Website: https://www.acmebyfullcircle.com/. See East State Village on our Streets of Fort Wayne page. December 12, 2022 post ACME by Full Circle on Facebook has a video stated: Special thanks to Thomas Couch for editing our videos and being apart of the team here at ACME by Full Circle making the 05 proud. Happy Holidays everyone! while a December 6, 2012 states: Name of instrumental music was “Don’t remember the 70’s”? — We think we should. Where Neighbors Meet Since 1941.

ACRES Land Trust

How did ACRES begin? posted Jun 29, 2018 by ACRES Land Trust on YouTube
Have you ever wondered why ACRES is always capitalized?

Website: https://acreslandtrust.org/, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ACRES.LT/. Monthly e-newsletter: https://acreslandtrust.org/email-news... Founded March 2, 1960, 1802 Chapman Road, Huntertown, Indiana (260) 637-2273, by local environmentalists Tom and Jane Dustin preserving natural areas around the tri-state area allowing them to remain or return to as close to their original condition as possible in dozens of preserves, totaling over 5,000 acres, from Allen County into southern Michigan, northwest Ohio and further south and west into Indiana. These preserves show how the land may have looked when Native American lived here and pioneers arrived for the first time. The Bicentennial Woods Preserve was acquired in 1994 to honor Fort Wayne's Bicentennial as an old growth preserve in Allen County. See web site ACRES Land Trust their ACRES in the news list of Media Relations headlines. or Facebook page. State nature preserves program proves there's more than cornfields in Indiana by Kevin Kilbane published March 20, 2017 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.

  1. Recreating a 1960 photo of ACRES founders by ACRES Land Trust on Dec 29, 2022 on YouTube
    ACRES was founded in 1960 by 12 people who each pitched in $5 to protect local land forever. In 2022, the ACRES staff recreated a photo of some of these founding members. Watch to see how we recreated this moment in history!

  2. March 8, 2023 post by ACRES Land Trust on Facebook:

    Happy International Women's Day!

    Ethyle Bloch, one of ACRES twelve founders, was instrumental in protecting land and waterways in Indiana.

    She and her closest friend, Jane Dustin, brought attention to the pollution of Indiana's waterways. They pursued the development of state waterway regulations and water quality standards. Thanks to their efforts, and the efforts of other ACRES members, Indiana's waters are much healthier!

    Ethyle also served on the Water Resources Committee for the League of Women Voters during the 50's, was the first woman President of the Indiana Izaak Walton League, was a Board Member of the River Greenway organization, and was President of the Hoosier Environmental Council.

    Thank you Ethyle for sharing your passion with Indiana and ACRES, your legacy continues to inspire us today!

    📷 Left to right: Bill Bloch, Ethyle Bloch, John Klotz, Jane Dustin

  3. A detail of the Dustin Barn - built between 1919 & 1920. This Indiana barn sits on the property of the Acres Land Trust,...

    Posted by Indiana Barn Foundation on Thursday, April 4, 2024

    Thursday, April 4, 2024 post by the Indiana Barn Foundation on Facebook:

    A detail of the Dustin Barn - built between 1919 & 1920. This Indiana barn sits on the property of the Acres Land Trust, a nonprofit dedicated to protecting natural & working lands in Indiana, Ohio & Michigan.

    Photo taken at the 2021 Barn Tour, put on by the Indiana Barn Foundation.

    Photo Credit @media37_indy

    Venue: @acreslandtrust

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    #barnrestoration #barnsofinstagram #onebarnatatime #indianabarns #historicpreservation #historictrades #redbarns #midwestbarns #ruralamerica #historiclandmark #lookatthewindow

  4. July 19, 2023 post by ACRES Land Trust on Facebook:

    Thank you Input Fort Wayne for the feature!

    Learn more about ACRES history, mission and more⤵️

    ACRES Land Trust, the nonprofit preserving land indefinitely throughout the region

  5. October 16, 2023 post by Mitch Harper on Facebook:

    Nice article on the history of Indiana's Nature Preserves and the role of Fort Wayne attorney James Barrett III (Barrett & McNagney) in the creation of Indiana's statute initiating protections.

    Barrett, a founder of Indiana’s ACRES Land Trust, called the areas “living museums,” where people can ponder the “interdependence of all forms of life” and be reminded of human health’s “vital dependence … upon the health of the natural communities.” Copied from DNR celebrates 300 nature preserves, humble beginnings Since John Bacone joined DNR in 1978, the number of nature preserves in Indiana has grown sixfold: from 46 to 300. Leslie Bonilla Muñiz - October 16, 2023.

    ACRES Land Trust instrumental in bold 50-year legacy of Indiana’s Nature Preserves Act at ACRES Land Trust

Adair - E. Ross Adair Federal Building and United States Courthouse, formerly Fort Wayne Federal Building

Walpole Colerick, Congressman from Fort Wayne pressured the Indiana legislature to appeal to Congress for a federal courthouse and post office in 1873. Funding by 1882 eventually led to a building opening in 1903 [in the Old Post Office]. On June 30, 1999, the Fort Wayne Federal Building was renamed to honor E. Ross Adair who served twenty years as Indiana’s Fourth District Congressman and Ambassador to Ethiopia. The name was officially changed to the E. Ross Adair Federal Building and United States Courthouse. A ceremony was held on October 27, 2000 to commemorate the renaming of the Fort Wayne Federal Building . Read more of the history in A Fort Wayne Architectural Landmark by Tom Castaldi published August 27, 2014 in History Center Notes & Queries blog. Photographs of the E. Ross Adair Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Fort Wayne, Indiana original digital files at The Library of Congress

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Adams Center Landfill

March 18, 2014 post by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook:

June 8, 2016 post by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook:

It's Wall of Fame Wednesday Folks! Check out this 8" x 10" glossy photo from The Journal-Gazette article on the Adams Center Landfill in 1984 of Hofer and Davis! While employed by our fathers at that time, we visited the landfill once a month to measure the amout of waste put into a pit to determine when it would be full.

African / African American Historical Society Museum of Allen County

436 East Douglas Avenue. Kachmann Gallery, 1301 Lafayette Street, on the corner of Douglas Avenue, founded in 2000, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AfricanAfrican-American-Historical-Society-Museum-of-Fort-Wayne-Indiana-953479621340167/. See Celebrate the African/African-American Historical Society’s Anniversary! by Renee M. published March 20, 2012 on the VisitFortWayne blog. Was part of a 2009 conference at the Allen County Public Library discussed in Genealogy gathering; 420 expected for conference, library's largest yet by Nick West published October 2, 2009 on The News-Sentinel newspaperon the Internet Archive Wayback Machine . African American Settlements in Indiana at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

May 15, 2023 post by Indiana Landmarks on Facebook:

At one time, the neighborhood southeast of downtown Fort Wayne was home to many of the city’s Black residents. As the business district expanded following World War II, commercial buildings, offices, and parking lots claimed many of the area’s older houses. One unlikely survivor serves today as home of the African/African-American Historical Society Museum of Fort Wayne, founded in 2000 to share the cultural heritage of Africa and the achievements of Blacks locally and nationally.

Located at 436 E. Douglas Avenue, the duplex that houses the museum’s collection has its own story to tell. It is the only building still standing in Fort Wayne once listed in the Negro Motorist Green Book, a travel guide for African Americans published between 1936 to 1967 to chronicle businesses safe to visit. Listed as “Mrs. B. Talbot’s Tourist Home,” the large Victorian residence offered shelter for Black travelers who were not welcomed in local, white-owned hotels.

The museum includes the area’s largest public collection of African art, as well as documents, photos, and artifacts highlighting Allen County’s Black and African American history from 1809 to present day. Read more about the museum, including how a recent grant is helping protect its collection: https://www.indianalandmarks.org/.../grant-helps-african.../

June 8, 2023 post by Indiana Landmarks on Facebook:

Located at 436 E. Douglas Avenue, the duplex that houses the African/African-American Historical Society Museum of Fort Wayne has its own story to tell. It is the only building still standing in the city once listed in the Negro Motorist Green Book, a travel guide for African Americans published between 1936 to 1967 to chronicle businesses safe to visit.

Aircraft Crashes

From an October 25, 2017 discussion about local airplane crashes at Baer Field on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

  1. Saturday, April 28, 1951, 11 people were killed when a United Airlines DC-3, Flight 129, departed Cleveland, Ohio heading for Chicago, crashed on approach to Baer Field, killing 8 passengers and a crew of 3. There was a severe thuderstorm in the area, when the aircraft was east of the airport the wind increased to 60-65 miles per hour with gusts to 85 miles per hour and a heavy rainfall began, accompanied by lightning and severe static. See Accident Description on AviationSafety.net.
  2. In the late 1950's, Lt. Art Ivan, from Leo, crashed an Air Guard jet but bailed out and survived. No information was found online.
  3. Friday, February 10, 1989, 1st Lt. David E. Kruse, 26, of Fort Wayne, a weapons specialist crash-landed an Indiana Air National Guard F-4 fighter jet after smoke filled the cockpit and the pilot passed out, officials said. Kruse, the pilot died but the other crewman, Maj. Wilburt J. Elliott, 39, of South Bend, survived. Read A weapons specialist crash-landed an Indiana Air National Guard... published February 11, 1989 on UPI.com, the United Press International. Also discussed October 24, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

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Allen County Children's Home

Bodies of the Orphans Found
May 29, 1913
Fort Wayne News

Was on Bluffton Road in 1917 across from what is now Quimby Village. Designed by Marshall S. Mahurin. The Genealogy Center blog St. Vincent Villa Sources Online posted February 09, 2015 says The records of the Allen County Children's Home were “lost” many years ago and their Remembering the Flood of 1913 blog by Dawne posted March 22, 2013 mentions children drowning from the home also mentioned below including sources of information.

See also Allen County Orphan's Home, Allen County Poor Farm, Fort Wayne Children's Home, Fort Wayne Developmental Center, and St. Vincent Villa Catholic Orphanage.

  1. The Orphan's Home, opened in 1842 from page 360 in The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River , was on the southwest corner of Webster and Wayne, with Bernard Rekers, Director in the 1858 Fort Wayne City Directory.
  2. Some of the Bricks were used to build Waynedale United Methodist Church. The barn was then used to house a riding stable, there is a crossing built into the river you can still make out so they could take the horses over to Foster Park and ride the Bridle Trail (now the hiking trail that runs along the rivers edge). It's where the seats pavilion is now. You can still see the carriage house there. March 26, 1913 it was flooded, 60 children were stranded, with 3 drowning during rescue attempts to evacuate the building.
  3. May 29, 1913 Fort Wayne News newspaper article.
  4. Flood of the century A Look Back At The Flood of 1913 And How It Changed Fort Wayne - Part 1 by Cindy Larson of The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  5. From the archives: Headstone, service memorialize orphans The girls died in the flood of 1913 by Darnell J. Compton of The News-Sentinel newspaperMarch 20, 2013 shows photo. Originally published July 12, 1999 the story is about Girl Scout Cadet Troop 199 conducting a memorial service at Lindenwood Cemetery and dedicating a headstone at the graves of Alice Mannen and Kittie Wise, two girls who died trying to flee the Allen County Orphan's Home during Fort Wayne's flood of 1913.

Allen County Courthouse

See our Allen County Courthouse page.

Allen County Fairground

Built on Carroll Road in 1989, website http://allencountyfairgroundsin.com/, Facebook. The Allen County Fair started in the 1940s at the old Fort Wayne Speedway, then bounced between Huntertown and Woodburn, until they found a home in the Coliseum, until it expanded and moved to Carroll Road. The Allen County Fair is the only county that does not receive state funding for the fair, as funding is entirely from one week of fair each July.

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Allen County Jail

101 E Superior St, Fort Wayne, IN 46802, Phone: (260) 449-7376 

Website: http://www.allencountysheriff.org/jail/, Mailing Address for Allen County Jail: 417 S. Calhoun St.

Allen County Sheriff website: http://www.allencountysheriff.org/

Street View photo from Google maps

The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Taylor, Samuel R., Mrs Publication date 1917 on Archive.org. Middle of page 279 says the log jail stood until 1847 when it was destroyed by fire.

April 8, 2022 post by The History Center on Facebook:

In 1847, the first Allen County Jail, constructed out of logs, was destructed by fire and no official action was taken to replace it. On April 7, 1849, exactly 173 years ago today, city council ordered the mayor to procure a building to be used as a jail. Subsequently a committee had a jail constructed for $270 on the northeast corner of Harrison and Berry Streets, while plans for a more permanent structure were considered. The new jail and sheriff’s residence was finally completed in 1852 at the cost of $4,955.34 and was located on Calhoun Street across from the current jail. Though there were several escapes from this new jail, it served the people of Allen County for 20 years until its successor was completed in 1872. #sociallyhistory

See the Jailhouse Flats.

Built in the 1850s, the previous brick jail served from the 1850s until early 1981, when the first section of the current jail opened across the street. The building was razed soon thereafter, and its long history includes being the site of perhaps the county's most notorious public hanging.An estimated 15,000 people watched Samuel McDonald die in the jail's courtyard on Oct. 9, 1883, after being convicted of murdering Louis Laurent. Because the fall did not break his neck, it took McDonald 17 minutes to die of strangulation. The noose used to hang McDonald and the hatchet he used on Laurent are in the collection of the History Center, as is an iron door from one of the old jail's cells. Copied from Site of old county jail, infamous hanging could be used for downtown development by Kevin Leininger published February 10, 2017 in The News-Sentinel newspaperarchived on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.

  1. March 27, 1981 Jail Break
    A March 27, 1981 This jailbreak has sheriff's blessing article in the The Journal Gazette newspaper was posted on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook.
  2. Future of the Allen County Jail https://allencounty.us/jail
  3. Allen County Jail: Chained to the past, ordered to improve This series from The Journal Gazette looks at issues surrounding the Allen County Jail as officials deal with a court order to improve conditions. Dozens of links to previous articles dated as early as April 2, 2022 on The Journal Gazette newspaper.
  4. January 5, 2023 video post by Elevatus Architecture on Facebook:

    Elevatus has been featured in Fort Wayne Magazine's annual Innovation issue regarding the Allen County Jail project. Justice Leader Tony Vie and President Cory Miller were highlighted in the feature. Find it starting on magazine page 42 of the Fort Wayne magazine January 2023.

    See more on Elevatus Architecture.

  5. February 10, 2023 post by Allen County INfo on Facebook:

    Revised site plans for the proposed Allen County Jail are available on the county website at allencounty.us/jail under the “Update” section.

    After a meeting with residents from nearby neighborhoods in January, the Board of Commissioners asked Elevatus Architecture to revise site plans in response to neighbors’ concerns. Some of the most significant updates include the building shift of 75 feet to the west for even less visibility to nearby neighbors, the inmate drop off and release point moved to the south end of the building while staff parking moved to the north and fencing was added to create a continuous border from the woods to Meyer Road.

    The new plans will be presented at the next Fort Wayne Board of Zoning Appeals meeting on Thursday, February 16, 2023, at 5:30 pm.

Allen County Newspapers

ALLEN COUNTY NEWSPAPERS: A SHORT HISTORY of local newspapers back to 1838 by Justin Clark published April 18, 2017 on Hoosier State Chronicles Indiana's Digital Historic Newspaper Program. 

Allen County Orphan's Home

Page 525, 1892 Allen County Orphans' Home in The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Taylor, Samuel R., Mrs, Publication date 1917 on Archive.org

The Orphan's Home is item #88 on Griswold's birdseye view of the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana indexed for ready reference zoomable map at the The Library of Congress with a closeup image posted August 20, 2022 posted by Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and authoronHistoric 07 District - Fort Wayne on Facebook. It is also online as Griswold's birdseye view of the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana indexed for ready reference by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Hixon, W. W Publication date 1907 on Archive.org. Both Birdseye maps are found on our Maps page.

August 20, 2022 post byHistoric 07 District - Fort Wayne on Facebook:

The Allen County Orphans' Home once stood where Indian Village Park sits today. This, as the name states, was a home for children who would be placed with willing parents. Today is a short history of this orphanage.

In 1894 a private, non-profit, charitable corporation was formed by the citizens of Fort Wayne. This voluntary association had shareholders, each of whom paid $1 per share to support what would become the "Allen County Orphans' Home." Seeking a location, the Board led by Thomas Ellison worked with the County to construct a building on the grounds of the then-current poor farm. Ellison, a prominent city attorney, served as an Indiana state senator from 1896 to 1899, helping to author many Indiana laws requiring care for dependent children.

From November 19, 1894, to April 1, 1920, the expense of maintaining and operating the home for orphans was borne and met by association. The amounts paid to the association by the County for the care of children were barely sufficient and were sometimes insufficient to meet the cost of food alone. To pay all the expenses of maintaining the home, the voluntary association was accustomed to soliciting contributions and help from the public. Unfortunately, it became too much to bear, and the Orphans' Home ceased operations by ceding maintenance and control to the Allen County Board of Commissioners.

Shortly after, in 1925, the City and Suburban Building Company purchased the land, which included the poor farm and orphanage. Eventually, while building Indian Village, the Company traded the 10.5-acre area back to the County in exchange for the city funding the swinging suspension bridge across the St. Mary's River. The only known remains of the original orphanage are the brick buildings in the Indian Village Park today and the Waynedale United Methodist Church. The Church purchased one of the buildings, dismantled it, and used the bricks for their future congregation in Waynedale around 1927.

Information From:

In re Lowe's Est., 117 Ind. App. 554, 70 N.E.2d 187 (1946)

Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana

[ Some of this information is in the legal case Most Reverend Noll v. Lincoln National Bank & Trust Co., 117 Ind. App. 554 (1946) Dec. 12, 1946 · Appellate Court of Indiana · No. 17, 422 117 Ind. App. 554 In re Lowe's Estate Most Reverend John F. Noll, etc., et al. v. The Lincoln National Bank and Trust Co. of Ft. Wayne, etc., et al. Rehearing Denied March 6, 1947. Transfer Denied October 8, 1947. at Caselaw Access Project at Harvard Law School. ]

See Fort Wayne Orphan Home, Twenty-Fifth Anniversary, 1908 at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

See orphan search results at the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library. Catholic Orphan Home for Girls (St. Vincent Villa Catholic Orphanage?) and Fort Wayne Orphan Home of the Reformed Church appear and need clarification as to where and if any other names?

See also Allen County Children's Home, Allen County Poor Farm, Fort Wayne Children's Home, Fort Wayne Developmental Center, and St. Vincent Villa Catholic Orphanage.

Indiana Orphanages by Indiana Genealogical Society, Inc. April 3, 2023 on YouTube
Apr 3, 2023 #familyhistory #genealogy #indiana This was an IGS Facebook Live Event from February 2022. We discussed Indiana orphanages with Diane Steproe. As an experienced genealogist and researcher, Diane has extensive knowledge of the history and genealogy of Indiana orphanages. During our discussion, we learned about these institutions, as well as the impact orphanages had on Indiana's social history. Don't miss this insightful conversation with Diane Steproe! The Indiana Genealogical Society is proud to host the IGS Facebook Live events, which are held on the first Tuesday of every month. For updates on our upcoming events, please visit our Facebook page at @indianagensoc. And if you have ancestors from Indiana, be sure to check out our website at www.indgensoc.org for more resources and information on how to connect with your Hoosier roots.

Allen County Parks Department

Web site http://allencountyparks.org/and Facebook.

Allen County Penal Farm

Barracks photo in May 17, 1919 The News-Sentinel newspaperposted April 22, 2017 onthe original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.

Allen County Poor Farm, County Asylum, Poor Asylum

County Asylum also known as the Poor Farm is on page 54 of the History of Allen County, Indiana. Publication date 1880 on Archive.org

See the Allen County Poor Farm Cemetery, Allen County Health Center Cemetery, and Byron Health Center.

Our History from the Byron Wellness Community on September 19, 2023 stated:

Byron Wellness Community has its roots as the Allen County Poor House, built in 1853 in the Waynedale area. In 1916, the facility was moved to its current location and Fort Recovery, an anti-tuberculosis tent hospital was established. This later became known as Irene Byron Hospital. The facility was named to honor Irene Byron, who died while serving her country in World War I and was an executive secretary of the Anti-Tuberculosis League.

Although a showplace through the 1930s, the facility came on hard times until 1954 when the Allen County Home, as it was called then, was placed under the direction of a new superintendent, Orville Miller, who lived at the facility with his wife, Sylvia and four daughters. Miller took a vital role in updating the facility and inviting the community to help do so. Miller served until his death in 1965. The facility became licensed as a nursing home in 1966. Tom Kastanis was appointed superintendent in 1965 and the facility’s name was changed to the Allen County Health Center. It was that year that the facility became self-sustaining. This was primarily due to the implementation of the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

In 1974, the Allen County Health Center merged with the Irene Byron Hospital forming Byron Health Center with a bed capacity at that time of 500. The tuberculosis unit was then closed the following year resulting in a 466-bed intermediate care facility. The Medicaid program, which paid the cost of care for the majority of residents, did not provide sufficient funding to cover these costs. Rates had not increased sufficiently to keep up with inflation. The increasing cost of operating the facility resulted in the need for a subsidy from Allen County. John Mauch became the administrator in 1989. By 1990, the cost to the County approached $1 million and a decision to either close the facility or find another operator had to be made.

In 1995, the Allen County Commissioners signed an agreement with Recovery Health Services to operate the facility and Byron Health Center became the first county facility of its type to ever morph from being governmental in nature to being run as a private, not-for-profit entity in the state of Indiana. A few shorter-term administrators ran the facility from 1993 through 1997 including Ed Reef, Gene Larrabee and Ken Lizer.

Peter Marotti took over operations until his retirement in 2012 when current CEO, Deb Lambert, took over the helm until 2017. With Deb continuing with Strategic Planning, Executive Director, Sarah Starcher-Lane took over of day-to-day operations in July 2017.

Byron Wellness Community moved to its new state-of-the-art facility in May 2020 when it came to be known as Byron Wellness Community, at 1661 Beacon Street, in the heart of the medical corridor of Fort Wayne.

The Poor Farm is item #74 on Griswold's birdseye view of the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana indexed for ready reference zoomable map at the The Library of Congress with a closeup image posted August 20, 2022 posted by Randy Harter, Fort Wayne historian and authoronHistoric 07 District - Fort Wayne on Facebookpost. It is also online as Griswold's birdseye view of the city of Fort Wayne, Indiana indexed for ready reference by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Hixon, W. W Publication date 1907 on Archive.org. Both Birdseye maps are found on our Maps page.

Also known as the County Asylum. The Allen County “Poor Farm,” as it was originally called, was established in 1853 and was first located in the wilderness of section 29 of Wayne Township (in the area of present-day Elmhurst High School, north of Lower Huntington Road). In that year George L. Parker was employed to keep the paupers at the Poor Farm for an annual sum of $600, and John A. Robinson was retained to build a house for the inmates for $750. These facilities were enlarged in 1854 and again, extensively, in 1860, during the directorship of James M. Read. In these years the director was required to furnish a team of horses, a wagon and harness, four cows and such farming equipment as would be necessary. The county, in exchange, paid Read $800 and furnished clothing and provisions for the inmates.

In 1864, at the height of the Civil War, the entire facility was moved closer to Fort Wayne. An infirmary was built as the centerpiece to the new farm, in the area just west of the present-day Bluffton Road Bridge, in what today is known as the Indian Village neighborhood and the Quimby Village Shopping Center. The new infirmary building was completed in June 1865, for $14,468, and James Read, the former overseer of the Poor Farm, was named Superintendent of the Allen County Asylum, as it was now called.

Expansion of the infirmary space was again required in 1871, and under Superintendent John Spice provisions were made to offer care "for the convenience and better management of the different classes of inmates" (History of Allen County, 1880, p.54). This is the facility that, in 1902, William Johnston came to superintend. Today, in Allen County, the descendant of the old county Poor Farm and Asylum is the Irene Byron Health Center. Behind the Main Building and connected to it with a covered porch was the Insane Ward. North of the Main Building was the Power House and Laundry. South of the Main Building was the Bakery and farther south were the horse and cattle barns, the horse barn being nearest the road. Copied from I WAS RAISED AT THE POOR FARM posted March 9, 2005 in The Waynedale News.com. Most of the same text is found including photos on Allen County Infirmary at Asylum Projects.org.

July 12, 2020 post byHistoric 07 District - Fort Wayne on Facebook:

Anchoring the Historic 07 District - Fort Wayne is Quimby Village, and it is exciting to see more development occurring with the addition of Crescendo Coffee & More. Although the Clyde opened in 1951, the history of this area extends much further. In fact, most of the land across the Oakdale Bridge was used as the Allen County Poor Farm (1915).

The Allen County "Poor Farm," as it was originally called, was established in 1853 and was first located in the wilderness of section 29 of Wayne Township (in the area of present-day Elmhurst High School, north of Lower Huntington Road). In 1864, at the height of the Civil War, the entire facility was moved closer to Fort Wayne. An infirmary was built as the centerpiece to the new farm, in the area just west of the present-day the Oakdale Bridge, in what today is known as the Indian Village neighborhood and the Quimby Village Shopping Center.

See also Allen County Children's Home, Allen County Orphan's Home, Fort Wayne Children's Home, Fort Wayne Developmental Center, and St. Vincent Villa Catholic Orphanage.

  1. Allen County Poor Asylum Registers, 1853-1939 at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana
  2. Allen County Poor Asylum Registers, 1933-1963 at The Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana
  3. The Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana has an Allen County Poor Asylum Inmate Index from a book written and submitted by Don Weber in their Members Only section.
  4. It is discussed a few times in a poor farm search of The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River Volume 1 by B. J. Griswold on Archive.org.
  5. Stuck in the Poorhouse: The Complexity of Poverty by Tom Mackie posted on July 25, 2018 on the Indiana History Blog by Indiana Historical Bureau.
  6. The Poor Farm was discussed in several articles by The Waynedale News.com Staff. They have lots of interesting history articles on their Waynedale History page.
    1. I WAS RAISED AT THE POOR FARM posted March 9, 2005. The following is a memoir written in 1986 by Carl C. Johnston, a reprint from the Old Fort News 1986, provided by The History Center, Fort Wayne courtesy of Marilyn Horrell. The memoir, which includes some recollections of his aunt, Gladys Marie Young of Fort Wayne, concerns his youth at the Allen County Asylum under the superintendency of Carl’s grandfather, William H. Johnston, who governed the institution from 1908 to 1920. THE ALLEN COUNTY ASYLUM The Allen County “Poor Farm,” as it was originally called, was established in 1853 and was first located in the wilderness of section 29 of Wayne Township (in the area of present-day Elmhurst High School, north of Lower Huntington Road).
    2. THE POOR FARM SCHOOL I WAS RAISED AT THE POOR FARM - Continued by Cindy Cornwell posted March 23, 2005. The following is a memoir written in 1986 by Carl C. Johnston, a reprint from the Old Fort News 1986, provided by The History Center, Fort Wayne courtesy of Marilyn Horrell. The memoir, which includes some recollections of Carl C. Johnston’s aunt, Gladys Marie Young of Fort Wayne, concerns his youth at the Allen County Asylum under the superintendency of Carl’s grandfather, William H. Johnston, who governed the institution from 1908 to 1920.
    3. THE POOR FARM SCHOOL The Main Building posted April 6, 2005.
    4. THE POOR FARM SCHOOL Power Plant posted April 20, 2005
  7. The county home in Indiana : a forgotten response to poverty and disability by Hassett, Kayla at Ball State University. ABSTRACT: The county home is a rapidly disappearing building type in Indiana. Also known as the poorhouse, poor asylum, or county farm, the county home was Indiana’s first unified response to poverty and disability. County homes were built in each of Indiana’s ninety-two counties, but today, over half of these buildings either sit vacant or have been demolished. This thesis includes a survey of Indiana’s remaining county homes, recording forty-eight buildings in forty-seven counties. Information regarding each building’s architectural significance, condition, and current use is noted. Though reuse can be difficult, often due to large building size or rural location, it is possible. Several successful examples of adaptive reuse of county homes exist across the state, as this thesis illustrates. See her 353 page paper with photos THE COUNTY HOME IN INDIANA: A FORGOTTEN RESPONSE TO POVERTY AND DISABILITY A THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE MASTER OF SCIENCE HISTORIC PRESERVATION BY KAYLA HASSETT (VERA A. ADAMS) BALL STATE UNIVERSITY MUNCIE, INDIANA MAY 2013.
  8. County homes, once known as "poor asylums" posted September 1, 2018 on the Archives of Hoosier History Live podcast on Saturdays, noon to 1 p.m. ET on WICR 88.7 FM introduction starts with: In 1816, the first Indiana Constitution required counties "to provide one or more farms to be an asylum for those persons who by reason of age, infirmity or other misfortunes may have a claim upon the beneficence of society." Jim Glass.By the 1850s, "poor asylums" (as they were called then) had been opened in all 92 counties. According to Indianapolis-based historic preservationist Jim Glass, most of these residences - which later came to be known as county homes - had an adjacent farm. The houses were adapted to shelter the indigent and elderly; sometimes orphans and people with mental illnesses stayed in them as well. Most of the county homes closed after the creation of Social Security during the 1930s. But ten continue to operate across Indiana to this day.
  9. In the nineteenth century, Indiana’s plan for caring for the poor and disabled centered on the development of poor farms, where people in need could work in exchange for housing and food. All 92 counties created poor farms between 1831 and 1860, but as federal agencies supplanted them, county homes gradually lost their purpose, leaving county governments and private owners struggling to find new uses for the historic complexes. Today, only 47 remain. ⁠In 2014, Indiana Landmarks supported a multiple property National Register nomination for all of Indiana’s county homes, paving the way for individual homes to be listed, Copied from a August 27, 2022 post by Indiana Landmarks on Facebook. The status of the 2014 project is unknown.

Poor Farms in Indiana by Indiana Genealogical Society, Inc. April 3, 2023 on YouTube
#familyhistory #genealogy #indiana This was an IGS Facebook Live Event from May 2022. In May of 2022 IGS Facebook Live explored the topic of poor farms in Indiana with Judy Baker. Judy has a wealth of knowledge on the history and genealogy of poor farms in Indiana. The Indiana Genealogical Society is proud to host the IGS Facebook Live events, which are held on the first Tuesday of every month. For updates on our upcoming events, please visit our Facebook page at @indianagensoc. And if you have ancestors from Indiana, be sure to check out our website at www.indgensoc.org for more resources and information on how to connect with your Hoosier roots.
See: IGS Presentation on Poor Farms May 2022 posted May 4, 2022 by Indiana Genealogical Society on Facebook.

Allen County Public Library

ACPL has a web site, Facebook page, videoson Facebook, and a YouTube channel. ACPL is home of the The Genealogy Center, also with a Facebook page, videos on Facebook. The Lincoln Collection at ACPL has Lincoln at the Library Series of videos on Internet Archive. ACPL is the meeting location for the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana, Inc.. ACPL remodeled all their county branches starting in 2002, culminating with the May 2004 to December 2006 remodeling and expansion of the full city block main library at 900 Library Plaza, with a grand reopening January 27, 2007. Photos can be seen on Gwathemy Siegle & Associates Architects, Inc. of New York, library architecture wiki Celsus: Fort Wayne Central Library Remodel, and Kinexxions blog at the January 27, 2007 Grand Opening ceremonies. Earlier Carnegie library was torn down in the 20th Century. See Allen County Public Library, List of Carnegie libraries in Indiana on Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopediaand INDIANA HAS MORE CARNEGIE LIBRARIES THAN ANY OTHER STATE on HoosierIndiana.com. See videos and more on our Library page.

Allen County Sheriff Department

Allen County Sheriff's Department officers down and Allen County Adult Probation Department officer down from the Officers Down Memorial Page. An October 14, 2022 post about Allen County Sheriffs and Fort Wayne Police by The History Centeron Facebook.

Allen County School for the Feeble Minded

See the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth.

Allen County Society for Crippled Children 

Formed in 1943, in 1947 opens Hanna Homestead School, in 1962 buyrs property at 2722 Fairfield Avenue, in 1985 relocates to current location at 3320 North Clinton Street. In 1989 officially renamed Turnstone Center for Disabled Children and Adults. See their History page for more information. Webpage: https://turnstone.org/, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TurnstoneCenter/. Turnstone: Celebrating 80 Years Tony Betton, Jr. March 20, 2023 on 21AliveNews.com.

Allen County Sweeper

Photo of building at 1800 Broadway, corner of Swinney Avenue, was discussed May 12, 2019 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook. Culled from the comments it was built around 1950 as Brouwer's Firestone and Texaco in the (late) Art Moderne style. It was a combination of tire store, filling station, service garage, and a small hardware-type retail store. The Brouwer family operated on the site prior to construction of the 1950 building, in a smaller Texaco filling station. Until 1965 was Brouwers Tire and Battery where Ray Ditton was the sales manager for Firestone tires. In the 1960s and 1970s it was a Goodyear tire and GE appliance store. TEKVenture maker lab moved to the block in 2014, then in 2017 moved to 1550 Griffin. There is tax sale information for Swinney Avenue Partners LLC 1800 BROADWAY.

Allen County War Memorial Coliseum

See our Allen County War Memorial Coliseum page.

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Alro Steel

Al Glick started Alro Steel in 1948. See History and Philosophy - Alro Steelon YouTube from their Alro Steel web site. 70th anniversary on January 1, 2013.

Alt Heidelberg

Hotel and restaurant photos including newspaper article from June 27, 1909 page 30 in The Journal Gazette newspaper August 7, 2017 and several photos August 27, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook. Newspapers.com shows that article and another article on page 12 in the July 12, 1913 in The News-Sentinel newspaper. An August 8, 1909 photo in The Journal Gazette newspaper was posted October 28, 2017 in the original Great Memories and History of Fort Wayne, Indiana page on Facebook.

Amazon

April 26, 2021 post by Inside INdiana Business on Facebook:

Fort Wayne Mayor Tom Henry says Amazon’s decision to locate a third fulfillment center in Allen County, this one with a commitment for nearly 1,000 jobs, was fueled by investment in quality of place amenities and infrastructure improvements. READ MORE: Henry: Quality of Life, Airport Helped Land Amazon

American Legion

105 East Lewis Street, taped August 11, 1976 American Legion Lincoln Post --Fort Wayne, Indiana
published November 11, 2016 by the Allen County Public Library on YouTube.
This clip is a short piece that is part of a longer series of Fort Wayne landmarks documented on open reel video tape in the 1970s. The series was made possible by the Fort Wayne Public Library, now the Allen County Public Library. This segment was recorded August 11, 1976 at 105 East Lewis in Fort Wayne, Indiana.
Camera and Editing by Steve Fortriede.

American Legion post 47, opened in 1919, was located on the north side of Wayne street, between Webster and Harrison. The legion post moved to Reed Road.

January 7, 2014 post by Restoration 226 on Facebook:

Date unknown. The building, seen here as a branch of the American Legion.

[ This photo is titled: American Legion, post 47, located on the north side of Wayne street, between Webster and Harrison. Includes toy shop/doll hospital. from the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library . ]

The page established in January 2014 has many photos of the building at 226 Wayne Street that was torn down in June 2014 to build the Ash Skyline Plaza that opened June 1, 2016.

Image discussed February 5, 2024 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook

Year book / The American Legion Department of Indiana by American Legion. Department of Indiana Publication date 1930 on Archive.org

American Red Cross

1212 E. California Road. See October 2, 1962 photo of brand new building for Allen County Chapter and Regional Blood Center for 43 Indiana and Ohio chapters in The Journal Gazette newspaper posted April 20, 2017 by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook.

Antibus Scales & Systems, Inc.

75th anniversary was on January 1, 2013. Inception in 1938, is a sales/service distributor in the weighing equipment business with sales and service capabilities. Headquarters in Fort Wayne with branch offices in both South Bend and Toledo Ohio serve customers within a 75 mile radius of either location. Web site: http://www.antibus.com/

Anthony Hotel

The nine-story, 263-rooms opened in Februry 1908 at 128 West Berry corner of Harrison Street. In 1947 leased to F. Harold Van Orman, president of Fort Wayne Daisies women's baseball team, along with Ernie Berg and Ramon Perry, was the original backer/owner of the newly formed (1952) Fort Wayne Komets. Hotel rebranded as the Van Orman until 1968, rebranded the Anthony and imploded January 13, 1974.

  1. Anthony Hotel search finds dozens of interior photos in the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Library.
  2. Anthony's tale with photos by Kevin Leininger January 23, 1982 inCityscapes from the Archives of The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  3. Anthony Hotel, Fort Wayne, Indiana, circa 1911 postcard: Postmarked August 15, 1911. Completed in 1908, the building was designed by Fort Wayne architect Charles Weatherhogg. It was located at the northeast corner of Berry and Harrison Streets. Later renamed the Van Orman, the hotel was imploded in 1974 and turned into a parking lot. on the The Indiana Album.
  4. The Anthony Hotel ca. 1946

    By Randy Harter
    Fort Wayne Reader
    2016-10-24

    The Fort Wayne Hotel Company began construction in of the nine-story, 263-room Anthony hotel in 1905, opening with a celebratory banquet in February of 1908. Ornate with a stained-glass central skylight and expansive use of marble, the hotel was designed by local architect Charles Weatherhogg who had the family crest of General Anthony Wayne emblazed on chair backs and other hotel items. Located at 128 West Berry, the northeast corner of Berry and Harrison, the hotel was first managed by Hugh Keenan and later by his son James. The Keenan family also operated other hotels in Toledo and Milwaukee and later even opened the competing Keenan Hotel at Harrison and Washington Streets in----- 1923. In 1947 the Anthony was leased to F. Harold Van Orman, who poured $400,000 into modernizing the popular downtown gathering place and rebranding it as the Van Orman. Harold Van Orman was also active locally as president of the Fort Wayne Daisies women’s baseball team and, along with Ernie Berg and Ramon Perry, was the original backer/owner of the newly formed (1952) Fort Wayne Komets. When Van Orman’s lease expired in 1968, it was again renamed the Anthony but closed a year later and fell into disrepair. With more than $100,000. owed in back taxes, the property was sold in 1973 to Fort Wayne National Bank who was seeking an adjacent parking lot. On January 13, 1974 and with 294 explosive charges, downtown’s grand dame for more than 65 years came down in just 9 seconds. Three blocks away and 10 months later in October, the 13-story Keenan Hotel met the same fate.

    (Image courtesy of ACPL)

    Randy Harter is a Fort Wayne historian and author of two books on local history.

Anthony Wayne Building

203 East Berry Street, Street View photo from Google Maps

A 15-story office building in the heart of downtown Fort Wayne. From the top floors looking east on a clear day you are able to see the windmill farm in Van Wert County, Ohio. Read about rennovation bringing in new businesses and condos in Rebirth of Anthony Wayne Building’s rehab pleases tenants by Dan Stockman published February 24, 2013 in The Journal Gazette newspaper now on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. See our Anthony Wayne page.

September 8, 2023 post by Sturges Property Group on Facebook:

Today is the last day of FUN 👏 FACT 👏 FRIDAY! 👏

...For now. 😉

So, let's go out with a bang and make a *mad* dash to Berry Street to find the Anthony Wayne Building! 🏢

While the exterior has not changed much from its construction in 1963, the interior has seen many renovations and tenants.

It all began in 1917 with the Morris Plan Company, which helped middle-class individuals obtain loans. After World War II, Morris Plan Co. restructured into the Anthony Wayne Bank. 🏦

In 1964, the company moved from its original space in the Elektron Building (currently home to Barrett McNagny) to the Anthony Wayne Building right next door.

The Anthony Wayne Bank stayed until 1987 when it was absorbed by Summit Bank, which was subsequently absorbed by Chase Bank.

Since the 80s, tenants have moved in and out, and the building experienced nearly complete emptiness for a short time.

But a resurgence in downtown Fort Wayne developments has brought new life to this iconic building. 🏙️

In 2012, the entire building was renovated to include four floors of office space, seven floors of condominiums, and ground-floor retail space. Along with the renovation, the building's name was officially changed to the First Financial Center at the Anthony Wayne Building.

Today, you can find The Hoppy Gnome 🍻 gastropub on the first floor, along with Premier Bank, J R Interiors, TriCore, 🖥️One Eleven Design, and Snow & Sauerteig. ⚖️

And Suite 107 is available for sublease!

Want to be a part of the ever-evolving downtown scene AND have a piece of Fort Wayne history? Call our brokers John Caffray and Andrew Eckert today for more information, and see our exclusive listing down below! 👇

Downtown Fort Wayne Office Sublease

#sturgespropertygroup #downtownfortwayne #dtfw #commercialrealestate #fortwaynehistory #fortwayne

Historic image credit to Allen County Public Library. See more here:

http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/

Anthony Wayne Institute

On West Wayne Street, 1917-1933 was a co-ed business school. During the Great Depression it served as local headquarters of the WPA, the Works Progress Administration, which provided jobs to depression era unemployed who compiled useful genealogy records of births, marriages, and deaths found on the shelves of the The Genealogy Center, and would build the runways at Fort Wayne’s Smith Field, and the pavilions at Foster Park. It was torn down in 2014 to build the Asher Brokerage world headquarters. No longer online in Doomed Building Played Major Role in City History by Eric Olson March 28, 2014 of Indiana NewsCenter.

Anthony Wayne Motor Company

The former 'Anthony Wayne Motor Company' dealership was built in the mid-1920s at the SE corner of Lafayette Street and E Washington Boulevard, along the Lincoln Highway. It was home to the Ford and Lincoln brands. After having sat vacant for a number of years, it was demolished (along with the old 412 Club behind it) in September 2017 to make way for the Fort Wayne Rescue Mission. Fort Wayne, Indiana. Copied from August 25, 2018 photo taken August 7, 2016 posted by Dan Baker on Facebook.

Anthony Wayne Washers

New Anthony Wayne Washer shown on age 415 of The Iron Age 1889-03-14: Vol 43 Publication date 1889-03-14 on Archive.org
Was mention on page VII in the 1897 Sears, Roebuck & Co. Catalog from 4 mentions on page VII, II, 9, and 10 in Anna, Washing Poems by Ted Genoways, 2008

Over 30 photos of various washing methods including Anthony Wayne Washers were posted June 28, 2022 by on Facebook. The first photo in the post was Anthony Wayne Washers showing the cover of a 26 page publication The New Improved "Anthony Wayne Washer." Publication: Buffalo: CM Dunston Lith,1892, was offered for sale, but marked sold in 2022 by Buckinghambooks.com states: 24 mo, 3-1/2" x 5-3/4" pictorial wrappers, 26 pp. (including the covers), illustrated. The Anthony Wayne Manufacturing Co. is in Fort Wayne, IN. The company claims to make their washing machines the best, most efficient, and most valuable washing machines in the country keeping their high standard of excellency that they've gained during the past six years. The Anthony Wayne Washer was first produced in 1886 and in a five year time period 65,000 units have been sold. The front cover is a lithograph of a woman cooking while her oldest child is running the Anthony Wayne Washer while reading, along with a toddler sitting on the floor, creating a happy family atmosphere. The rear cover is a lithograph of another manufacturer's washer and total chaos. On the inside front cover there is an illustration of The New Improved "Anthony Wayne Washer." There are illustrations and descriptions of the following: The Western Star Washer, The New Improved "Western Star Washer," Different Parts of the Gearing, Interior View of No. 2 & 3 Anthony Wayne Washers, and Interior View of No. 1 Anthony Wayne Washer. There are 16 pages containing satisfied dealer and customer testimonial reviews. There is another illustration of The New Improved "Western Star Washer" from a different angle on the inside rear wrapper. Stamped twice with the name Stockton & Allen, General Hardware in the body of the text, else a fine, bright copy of an elusive item. Page 64 of the September 16, 1893 The Metal Worker shows the price at $42.00 per dozen.

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ARCH, Inc.

Rankin House: Little House, Big History by ARCH Inc., posted August 11, 2020 on YouTube/
ARCH Inc. presents a virtual, video tour of the historic Rankin House. This tour is possible because of the support of the Community Foundation of Greater Foundation and our generous donors to the #GivingTuesdayNow project. Join them in supporting ARCH Inc. and its historic preservation work in the Fort Wayne area by visiting archfw.org. Invest in history for our future.

ARCH Inc. presents a virtual, video tour of the historic Rankin House. This tour is possible because of the support of the Community Foundation of Greater Foundation and our generous donors to the #GivingTuesdayNow project. Join them in supporting ARCH Inc. and its historic preservation work in the Fort Wayne area by visiting archfw.org. Invest in history for our future.

Website: www.archfw.org, Facebook https://www.facebook.com/archfw/, YouTube: ARCH Inc. - Architecture and Community Heritage since 1975. ARCH Endangered Structure List of 2012’s most endangered structures, with the number decreasing from 10 to eight since last year. Topping the list is the Merchant-Huxford House at 520 Tennessee Ave., the home of one of Fort Wayne’s earliest mayors. According to legend, the house contains timbers from the last fort in the city. The list also included the S.F. Bowser building on Creighton Avenue vacated by the Fort Wayne Police Department, then torn down in 2016. From ARCH endangered-structure list dips to 8 by Sarah Janssen of The Journal Gazette newspaper November 16, 2012.

November 22, 2022 post by ARCH, Inc. on Facebook:

Our books make great Christmas presents! To order, go to https://archfw.org/product-category/publications/

  1. Explore One of the ARCH Heritage Trails shows the Central Downtown Trail one of four available published June 23, 2015 on the Visit Fort Wayne blog.
    1. Heritage Trail by ARCH ( Architecture and Community Heritage)
    2. Central Downtown Trail 19 stops on the Heritage Trail by ARCH ( Architecture and Community Heritage)
    3. Kekionga Trail 11 stops on the Heritage Trail by ARCH ( Architecture and Community Heritage)
    4. South Central Trail 12 stops on the Heritage Trail by ARCH ( Architecture and Community Heritage)
    5. West Central Trail 17 stops on the Heritage Trail by ARCH ( Architecture and Community Heritage)
  2. Annual “Most Endangered” list and ARCHie award winners
  3. ARCH announces 2014 endangered list May 5, 2014 in The Journal Gazette newspaper. ARCH releases list of endangered sites with video May 6, 2014 on CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15.
  4. Taking Stock of Our Treasures, One Historic Building at a Time by Eric Olson published January 2, 2014 on 21Country at 21AliveNews.comnow on Internet Archive Wayback Machine.

Archbishop Noll House

At 1415 West Washington Boulevard.  In 1994 it was included on the "Fort Wayne Bicentennial Heritage Trail" as one of the outstanding homes in the celebrated West Central Neighborhood. From An Archbishop’s Home by Tom Castaldi, local historianpublished January 29, 2015 in the History Center Notes & Queries blog.

Armstrong Flowers

Website: www.armstrongflower.com, Facebook page, founded by Helen M. Armstrong who worked until age 90 and lived to age 100. In Memory of Helen M. Armstrong November 14, 1914 - April 3, 2015 obituary at Hockemeyer & Miller Funeral Home.

Aron's Oriental Rug Gallery

1117 Broadway, www.aaronsorientalruggallery.com, handmade rugs, Where every rug is a masterpiece. 40th anniversary was January 1, 2013.

Art

List of public art in Fort Wayne, Indiana at Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. This list applies only to works of public art accessible in an outdoor public space. For example, this does not include artwork visible inside a museum. Most of the works mentioned are sculptures.

Arts United Center

303 E Main Street, Street View photo from Google maps

Website: https://artsunited.org, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArtsUnitedGFW. In 1961, the architect Louis I. Kahn was commissioned by the Fine Arts Foundation to design and develop a large arts complex. ... By the summer of 1970, Kahn’s office had completed the working drawings for the theatre, and construction proceeded shortly after. In the end, only the Theatre of Performing Arts was completed out of the nine proposed buildings for the Fine Arts Center of Fort Wayne. The theatre was officially inaugurated in 1973, a year before Kahn’s death in 1974. See Fort Wayne AD Classics: Arts United Center / Louis Kahn by Evan Pavka published April 16, 2018 on ArchDaily.com. The path of Kahn Famed architect's imprint on Arts United Center unmistakable with several photos by Miriam Morgan published December 09, 2018 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.

Fort Wayne hasn’t shown any great love for architectural accomplishment. There is only one small Frank Lloyd Wright building in town, and other famous architects seem to have generally taken the bypass around our city. However, shortly before his death, Albert I. Kahn designed the exquisite Arts United Center, first known as our Performing Arts Center. Some of the most remarkable buildings on the planet bear Kahn’s signature, and we are fortunate to have one of them. But the “Kahn” name also shows up in at least one other Fort Wayne building of note – the former International Truck Engineering Center at 2911 Meyer Road [Street View photo], proposed site of the new Allen County Jail. A plaque on the building proclaims that the structure was designed and built by Albert Kahn Associates, a firm noted around the world, particularly among vehicle manufacturers. Copied from Proposed, current jail sites spur thoughts on aesthetics by Richard B. Hatch posted December 9, 2022 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.

For "Throwback Thursday" we share these pictures from THE FORT WAYNE NEWS - SENTINEL from February 24, 1968. The top...

Posted by Hofer and Davis,Inc. LAND SURVEYORS on Thursday, February 15, 2018

February 15, 2018 post by Hofer and Davis,Inc. LAND SURVEYORS on Facebook:

For "Throwback Thursday" we share these pictures from THE FORT WAYNE NEWS - SENTINEL from February 24, 1968. The top picture is looking West on Columbia from Lafayette. Does anyone remember when Columbia was a street going West to The Landing? We haven't figured out the bottom picture yet, although we think it is from Main Street looking North up Barr Street (we can see the elevated railroad tracks in the background pictured) BTW...Hofer and Davis, Inc. did the topographic survey for the Fine Arts Building in 1966.

January 4, 2024 post by PBS Fort Wayne is with Arts United on Facebook:

Check out these images taken during the construction of the Arts United Center!

Learn more about the history of this building, designed by world renowned architect Louis Kahn in: A Home for the Arts!

Tonight (01/04) at 8pm, on PBS Fort Wayne.

#AHomefortheArts #ArtsUnitedCenter #PBSFortWayne #Documentary

Watch the documentary A Home For The Arts on PBS.org Learn about the story of the bold vision that created Fort Wayne's Arts United Center This documentary tells the story of Fort Wayne's Arts United Center, from the shared bold visions of area leaders along with world renowned architect Louis I. Kahn. Follow the creation of this landmark through its construction to now, over 50 years later, as the centerpiece for the Arts Campus in downtown Fort Wayne.

A Home for the Arts Documentary January 5, 2024 PBS Fort Wayne on YouTube.
During the 1950s, the city of Fort Wayne sought to redevelop a struggling section of its downtown into a center for arts and culture. Realizing the magnitude and significance of this project, community leaders hired world renowned architect, Louis Kahn to design the center. Learn the story of Kahn’s bold vision for this midwestern city, and the uniquely designed Performing Arts Center he created.

Louis Kahn_violin inside violin case

See recordings of world-renowned architect, Louis Kahn, in "A Home for the Arts," TONIGHT at 8pm, and Thursday at 3pm, on PBBS Fort Wayne! Extended version includes an additional 6 minutes of content, and interviews with the Director, Jonathon Nuthals, and Dan Ross, CEO and President of Arts United! Watch on TV 📺, the PBS Fort Wayne website 💻, or PBS Fort Wayne app📱 #AHomefortheArts #ArtsUnited #PBSFortWayne #Documentary

Posted by PBS Fort Wayne on Wednesday, March 6, 2024

March 6, 2024 video post by PBS Fort Wayne on Facebook:

See recordings of world-renowned architect, Louis Kahn, in "A Home for the Arts," TONIGHT at 8pm, and Thursday at 3pm, on PBBS Fort Wayne!

Extended version includes an additional 6 minutes of content, and interviews with the Director, Jonathon Nuthals, and Dan Ross, CEO and President of Arts United!

Watch on TV 📺, the PBS Fort Wayne website 💻, or PBS Fort Wayne app📱

#AHomefortheArts #ArtsUnited #PBSFortWayne #Documentary

A Home for the Arts - Extended Version | FULL DOCUMENTARY | PBS Fort Wayne March 6, 2024 PBS Fort Wayne on YouTube.
During the 1950s, the city of Fort Wayne sought to redevelop a struggling section of its downtown into a center for arts and culture. Realizing the magnitude and significance of this project, community leaders hired world renowned architect, Louis Kahn to design the center. Learn the story of Kahn’s bold vision for this midwestern city, and the uniquely designed Performing Arts Center he created.
This documentary tells the story of Fort Wayne's Arts United Center, from the shared bold visions of area leaders along with world renowned architect Louis I. Kahn. Follow the creation of this landmark through its construction to now, over 50 years later, as the centerpiece for the Arts Campus in downtown Fort Wayne.
Brought to you in Part By Novae Corp & Ferguson Advertising

A & P - Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea company

Had 5 stores, 3 closed in 1975, the other 2 in 1977. See January 15, 2017 discussion on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

Ash Brokerage

888 S Harrison Street, Suite 900, Street View photo from Google maps, user submitted photos

Website: https://www.ashbrokerage.com/, Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AshBrokerage.

June 27, 2014 post by Hofer and Davis, Inc. Land Surveyors on Facebook:

This our "Bird's Eye View" of the new Ash Complex being built right across the street from our office at 203 West Wayne Street Suite 316, Fort Wayne, IN.

First photo from their 136 photo Album: ASH CHRONOLGY showing the site June 27, 2014 from demolition through building the new Ash building April 15, 2016.

 

Was shared March 26, 2023 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook.

April 27, 2015 post on Facebook: Check out our latest snapshots from downtown Fort Wayne! We know construction moves quickly - be sure to look at the Weigand Construction webcam for nearly up-to-the-minute views of progress.

http://www.ashbrokerage.com/blog/skyline/

Post is from the Ash Brokerage's albums: Ash Skyline Project Our new Headquarters is going up in downtown #FortWayne and we can't be more excited as the construction goes on!

Follow along as we add progress pictures of the parking garage and our new headquarters: http://www.ashbrokerage.com/blog/skyline/

February 19, 2016 post by Downtown Fort Wayne on Facebook:

Downtown got a little bit brighter tonight.  

May 27, 2016 post by Ash Brokerage on Facebook:

Ash Brokerage's albums: Ash Skyline | We've Moved In! The whole family is now here! After two weeks of moving in, all Fort Wayne employees are now at the new national headquarters. It's been four years in the making, but we're finally here. You can read all about the move in our latest blog here: http://www.ashbrokerage.com/blog/skyline/were-home/

Weigand Construction Msktd & Associates, Inc. City of Fort Wayne - Municipal Government Design Collaborative Downtown Fort Wayne

February 25, 2019 by Visit Fort Wayne on Facebook:

— with Ash Brokerage at Ash Brokerage.

September 23, 2021 post by Milan Center Feed & Grain on Facebook:

Beautiful turf does not always grow on the ground. Check out the Skyline Park Rooftop of the Ash building! We are thankful for the opportunity to provide Endure fertilizer for such a cool space! #milancenter #visionscapes #ashbuilding #downtownfortwayne

February 17, 2023 post by Hidden View Photography on Facebook:

Who even knew this was up here? Downtown #fortwayne

Asher Agency

535 W. Wayne Street, founded in 1974, founder Tim Borne and president Tom Borne still maintain highly visible roles even after they sold the business to a holding company based out of Tennessee a few years ago. Website: asheragency.com

Aspy's BestOne Tire & Auto Care

14808 Minnich Road, Hoagland, New Haven area, 58th anniversary on January 1, 2013, website: www.aspytire.com

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Atz Ice Cream

Started as a Kendallville ice cream factory in 1922, opened two Fort Wayne stores in 1956 at 3235 North Anthony Boulevard and 211 E. Tillman Road. Atz ice cream plant closes, but Fort Wayne shops will remain by Bob Caylor published September 21, 2011 story and a similar article Atz leaving ice cream biz Restaurants to carry on after 90-year tradition ends by Sherry Slater published September 22, 2011 in The News-Sentinel newspaper. September 22, 2014 Atz's ice cream shop closes after more than 50 years by Frank Gray published September 22, 2014 in The Journal Gazette newspaper. Atz's Ice Cream Closes Down After More Than Fifty Years In Business by Ian Hoover and Jeff Neumeyer published September 22, 2014 on 21AliveNews.com. Atz’s Ice Cream Shoppe closes its doors by WANE Staff Report published September 22, 2014 on CBS WANE-TV NewsChannel 15. Atz's ice cream owner dies, 90 by Frank Gray published February 28, 2016 in The News-Sentinel newspaper. See photos of Atz Ice Creamflavors photos posted January 14, 2017 and again August 7, 2017, Norman Atz photo and discussion February 10, 2017 and South Atz May 15, 2017 on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

Aunt Millie's Bakery

The iconic Sunbeam Bread sign in Fort Wayne, IN from Nicholas Giacalone on Vimeo.

350 Pearl Street. Started in 1901 by J. B. Franke as the Fort Wayne Biscuit Company. In early 1900s became Perfection Biscuit Company. In 1944 became a member of Quality Bakers of America (QBA) and began baking Sunbeam Bread April 26, 1942. Known for their 1957 iconic rotating Sunbeam bread sign, their name changed in 2005 to Aunt Millies, see How It All Started on the Aunt Millies website.

  1. August 1, 2013 post by Aunt Millie's Bread on Facebook:

    Aunt Millie's has been baking Sunbeam Bread since 1957. Today we received one of the nicest compliments ever, from Jeff Snow. Here is an excerpt:

    I was in Kokomo July 12th and 13th for Indiana Sprintweek. We bought a loaf of Sunbeam Giant bread that was hands down the best loaf of bread we had ever eaten. I figured it was from Aunt Millie's and flipped it over and confirmed that thought. I’d swear it felt and tasted like it was fresh out of the oven...

    You guys are doing something right when three guys watching sprint car races are talking about the quality of your bread!

  2. December 13, 2013 post by Aunt Millie's Bread on Facebook:

    Aunt Millie's bakes Sunbeam bread. Last week we received this message from Ashley Marie Glock that really made our day:

    Thank you so much for the Christmas packaging on the Sunbeam bread. Your courage has convinced me to always buy Aunt Millie's brand from now on! I posted this on my profile this morning after noticing it for the first time: (Sorry if this is a little lengthy, but I feel like it is worth it.) I had the most unexpected testimony this morning, and feel compelled to share it with anyone interested in reading it.

    I was making breakfast, worrying about the typical offenders: bills, the pets' health, school, family problems, friends who are struggling with various things, etc. When I went to put the bread away, I noticed a picture on the front of the bag of a little girl praying. I'd never really looked at the bread bag before, so I found it odd. Was this a seasonal thing, or does Sunbeam always have that there? I looked closer, and saw that the picture included next to it two Bible verse numbers in the tiniest, faintest print: Matthew 4:4 and Deuteronomy 8:3. So of course I look them up, because I'm shocked that in a christian-bashing society like this someone is allowed to put religious text on their packaging. Both of the verses said the following: "Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.”

    After reading that, I can't explain the sudden sense of peace and realization I felt. I was reminded that we don't rely on just "bread", or money, or material things, but on the words of God which include faith, hope, and love among many others. When I was least expecting it and really needed it, God reminded me in a subtle but amazing way that He will provide all things that we need in this life, and will give us peace and joy if we just remember what is truly important. And he did it just with a bag of bread. So if you are my friend or family and are struggling with anything big OR small, I love you with all of my heart. Try to remember that even if this world is throwing things at you one after another, God is there for you and will provide for you what you need. He loves you!

  3. In 2007 the sign was renovated in honor of its 50th birthday. Working on the sign are Creative Sign Resources employees Chris Young, Mike Becraft and Joe Glen.

    Posted by Aunt Millie's Bread on Tuesday, February 18, 2014

    In 2007 the sign was renovated in honor of its 50th birthday. Working on the sign are Creative Sign Resources employees Chris Young, Mike Becraft and Joe Glen.

    — at Aunt Millie's.

  4. Fort Wayne's most famous sign.

    Posted by Aunt Millie's Bread on Tuesday, July 29, 2014

    July 29, 2014post on Aunt Millie's Bread on Facebook:

    Fort Wayne's most famous sign.

  5. December 2, 2014 post by Aunt Millie's Bread on Facebook:

    In 1944, Aunt Millie’s Bakeries (then Perfection Biscuit Company) in Fort Wayne became a member of Quality Bakers of America (QBA) and began baking Sunbeam Bread.

    Here’s a toast -- to 70 years of Sunbeam!

  6. 7:29 minute video Aunt Millies Virtual Bakery Tour by Melissa Dunning July 16, 2015 on YouTube
    Take a virtual tour of Aunt Millie's Fort Wayne Bakery, and learn how bread is made, in this 7.5 minute video.
    A similar but shorter 6:10 minute video Aunt Millies Virtual Bakery Tour by Aunt Millie's Bakeries July 28, 2015 on YouTube
    Take a virtual tour of our Fort Wayne Bakery and learn how bread is made.

  7. Bakery rises to occasion by Terri Richardson published January 15, 2017 in The Journal Gazette newspaper now on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.
  8. Aunt Millie’s bakery in downtown Fort Wayne to close Over 90 employees will be affected; iconic sign to remain published November 6, 2017, LISA M. ESQUIVEL LONG AND JUSTIN KENNY, in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  9. A sign of continuity Cathie Rowand, November 8, 2017 in The Journal Gazette newspaper.
  10. Aunt Millie’s bakery operation in downtown Fort Wayne to close Over 90 employees will be affected; iconic sign, corporate offices to remain November 6, 2017 Kevin Leininger publishedin The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  11. KEVIN LEININGER: List of ingredients in Aunt Millie’s closing is long and complex explains the closing Kevin Leininger November 11, 2017 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  12. Sweetwater Sound buys Aunt Millie’s Bakery in downtown Fort Wayne by Kevin Leininger published October 8, 2018 in The News-Sentinel newspaper.
  13. June 29, 2021 post by The History Center on Facebook:

    Generations of Allen County residents have memories of the smell of baking bread wafting through downtown Fort Wayne. John B. Franke established the Wayne Biscuit Company in 1901, producing Perfection Wafers (P.W. Crackers) and later bread, cakes and cookies. In 1923 it became the first bakery in Indiana to offer wrapped bread. Always a family affair, after Franke’s death in 1927 his son-in-law H. Leslie Popp took over the running of the bakery (the Popp family still owns the bakery). By the mid-1950s the cookie and cracker lines were phased out. Since 1957 the iconic animated sign, featuring slices of bread falling fresh from the loaf, has been a landmark in downtown Fort Wayne. The aroma of baking bread began to waft over the city when Perfection Bakeries began making Sunbeam Bread in 1946 and Aunt Millie’s in the 1990s. Perfection Bakeries changed its name to Aunt Millie’s Bakeries in 2005. In 2017, it was announced that the Fort Wayne bakery would be closing. However, as a continued mark of its dedication to Fort Wayne, Aunt Millie’s announced that their corporate headquarters would remain at their Pearl Street location. #sociallyhistory

  14. May 20, 2023 post by Aunt Millie's Bread on Facebook:

    Recently we sat down with John H.D Wagner from 21Alive to discuss the Sunbeam sign at our corporate office in Fort Wayne, IN. Indeed, it is just that simple.

  15. February 8, 2024 post by Fort Wayne Business Weekly on Facebook:

    Feb. 8 - What's happening to Sunbeam sign with Aunt Millie's relocation?

  16. February 8, 2024 post by WANE 15 on Facebook:

    The move is planned for April.

    Aunt Millie’s headquarters moving to Waynedale; bread sign to stay on Pearl Street

  17. The 'iconic' Sunbeam Bread sign is staying put despite Aunt Millie's move February 9, 2024 FOX 55 Fort Wayne on YouTube
    For many people in Fort Wayne the Sunbeam Bread sign is iconic.

Automotive & Industrial Supply Co., Inc.

Serving Fort Wayne with 3 NAPA locations 58th anniversary on January 1, 2013.

Aveline Hotel

Aveline Hotel
1921 - Stories of Old Ft. Wayne - No. 12 by B. J. Griswold - Aveline Hotel in The Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette, Fort Wayne, Indiana, Sunday, Jul 10, 1921, page 22 on Newspapers.com.

The hotel was built in 1863 at the southeast corner of Calhoun and Berry streets by Francis Aveline.  A fire on May 3, 1908 killed 12 people. The main entrance was on Berry Street with a Ladies Entrance on Calhoun Street. From Death of the Aveline House by Kevin Leininger from theCityscapes - People & Places series of articles from the archives of The News-Sentinel newspaper. See the Aveline Family.

  1. Early on the morning of May 3, 1908, a fire of unknown origin destroyed the Aveline hotel at the southeast corner of Calhoun and Berry streets. Twelve persons lost their lives. Many guests of the upper floors were saved b,y leaping from windows or making their way to the roofs of adjoining structures. The site is now occupied by the Shoaff building. Copied from page 541 in the online book The pictorial history of Fort Wayne, Indiana : a review of two centuries of occupation of the region about the head of the Maumee River Volume 1 by Griswold, B. J. (Bert Joseph), 1873-1927; Taylor, Samuel R., Mrs, Publication date: 1917 on Archive.org on Archive.org.
  2. The hotel underwent many name changes over the years but ultimately kept the Aveline name from ‘For God's sake … get out!' 100 years pass since fire guts Aveline hotel by Kim Metzger published May 1, 2008 in The Journal Gazette newspaper now on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine.
  3. Score Die in Fire in Indiana Hotel in the Morris County Chronicle newspaper Tuesday, May 5, 1908 on Chronicling America newspaper archive at the The Library of Congress.
  4. 11 DIE IN FIRE IN INDIANA HOTEL; Three Thought to be in Ruins of New Aveline at Fort Wayne. MANY THRILLING ESCAPES J.C. Yingling Climbed Down Five Stories on a Wire, Losing $2,500 in Diamonds. May 4, 1908 in The New York Times archives.
  5. Eight Aveline Hotel photos at the History Center Digital Collection on the mDON mastodon Digital Object Network.
  6. Two Aveline Hotel fire photos at the The Indiana Album.
  7. One image of nearly 50 Aveline Hotel search results in the Allen County Public Library Digital Collections at the Allen County Public Libraryposted January 23, 2014 by Downtown Fort Wayne on Facebook:

    #ThrowbackThursdays in downtown Fort Wayne featuring a photo from May 3, 1908. This photo was taken after the fire at Aveline Hotel that used to stand at the corner of Berry St. and S. Calhoun St. Eleven people died in the fire. #TBT

     

    Another posted September 11, 2014 by Downtown Fort Wayne on Facebook.

  8. May 3, 2017 post by Allen County Public Library on Facebook:

    On this day in 1908 Fort Wayne's Aveline Hotel burned, killing 12 people. "In its day, the Aveline House was the city's most elegant hotel. In the end, it was the city's most elegant deathtrap." It was on the southeast corner of Calhoun and Berry streets and was built in the 1860s with a fifth floor added in the 1880s. Read more from the archives of The News-Sentinel Death of the Aveline House.

  9. September 8, 2023 post by the Genealogy Center on Facebook:

    Check out these pen and ink drawings including the 1861 Allen County Courthouse, Colerick's Hall, and the Aveline Hotel in Fort Wayne! 🎨

    These images come from the Bert J. Griswold Collection in our Community Album. Check out the collection here: http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/.../collection/p16089coll59 [see links to his online books on our B.J. Griswold section]

    Bert J. Griswold was born in 1873 in Osage, Iowa, and died in Fort Wayne in 1927. A gifted illustrator and cartoonist, he came to Fort Wayne in 1902, working for the Fort Wayne Daily News and the Fort Wayne Sentinel. He later left the newspaper to establish his own advertising agency. In the course of his work as a reporter and cartoonist, he developed a deep interest in the history of Fort Wayne and Allen County. He also became a prominent advocate for the City Beautiful Movement, which worked for the establishment of local parks and boulevard improvements. Griswold wrote short columns for the newspaper about area pioneers and historic buildings, and his efforts culminated in 1917 in the publication of the two-volume Pictorial History of Fort Wayne.

Postcard discussion February 15, 2023 on True Fort Wayne Indiana History on Facebook.

Azar's Big Boy Drive In Restaurants

The Azar family opened their first restaurant in 1954. By 1973 they had 27 restaurants including 22 Azar's in Indiana and Colorado, Char Kings, Moonraker and Fat Fritz's from a letter posted in a March 4, 2019 discussion with photos and over 100 comments, January 12, 2017, February 10, 2017, 1960s-1970s cruising July 2, 2017, Big Boy photo August 2, 2017 and general Search on You are positively from Fort Wayne, if you remember... Archived group only visible to existing members on Facebook.

  1. March 29, 2023 post by Indiana Album on Facbook:

    Fort Wayne, circa 1960 - Azar's Big Boy Restaurant and Coffee Shop, with its wonderful accordion roofline and colorful modern sign (that you can almost see, even in a black-and-white photo), was located on the NW corner of Calhoun and Berry Streets, opposite the Allen County Courthouse. Today a PNC Bank is on the site.

    This futuristic design was known as Googie architecture, named for the now-defunct Googies Coffee Shop in Hollywood. Characteristics include sloping roofs, boomerang-modern signs, geometric shapes, and an exaggerated use of steel, glass, and neon. Popular from 1945 until 1970, especially for roadside buildings such as restaurants and motels, the style sometimes used Space Age motifs such as satellites, atomic bursts, and rocket shapes. The flashy style fell out of favor by the 1970s when the ecology movement ushered in wood and stone structures that blended into a natural environment.

    Same photo was posted December 31, 2020 by Indiana Album in a larger post requesting more photos on Facebook: Fort Wayne, circa 1960 - Azar's Big Boy and Coffee shop stood on the NW corner of Calhoun and Berry Streets. More recently, PNC Bank has occupied this corner. Seen to the right is the Allen County Courthouse.

  2. November 1, 2021 post by The History Center in a larger post about welcoming immigrants to Fort Wayne on Facebook stating: Some of the most influential groups are those who came from geographical locations under the rule of the Ottoman Empire or formerly under its rule. These groups include, but are not limited to, the Lebanese-Syrians, Romanians, Macedonians, and Greeks. with photo labeled: Azar’s Big Boy Drive-In, Operated by the Azar family (Lebanese-Syrian).
  3. September 1, 2016 post by Indiana Album on Facebook:

    MYSTERY AZAR'S - Does anyone recognize this Azar's Drive-In and Restaurant from the 1960s? We believe that this was in northeastern Indiana. Azar's (a franchisee of Big Boy) was founded by Alex and David Azar of Fort Wayne in 1953. This design of sign and building was used as early as 1963. It is very similar to the Angola Azar's building at 309 N. Wayne (see picture in comments), but the sign was on the other side of the building. Any suggestions? (The Indiana Album: Johnson Brothers Sign Company Collection

     

    13 Azar photos in the 875+ photos in the Indiana Album: Johnson Brothers Sign Company Collection.

    The question was not answered. Quesses included South Bend, Goshen, Waynedale, Coliseum Blvd in Fort Wayne.

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Page updated: April 12, 2024